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RE: [Public WebGL] Content licensing



Policy wonkery is not the domain of language design.  It is the domain of
language implementation.  Because implementations are many and policy is
one, it is best left to another layer.  Business layers concern licensing
versions.   Here is where code meets contract.

Media types, media speed, media reliability.  Pick two or pick platforms.

len

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-public_webgl@khronos.org [mailto:owner-public_webgl@khronos.org]
On Behalf Of Alan Chaney
Sent: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 1:09 PM
To: public_webgl@khronos.org
Subject: Re: [Public WebGL] Content licensing

Hi Chris

Chris Marrin wrote:
> On Apr 12, 2010, at 8:54 AM, Alan Chaney wrote:
>
>   
>> Hi
>>
>> I've been excited about the possibilities of WebGL since I first heard
>> about it. One question that has come up in our internal discussions has
>> been that of copyright protection and ownership. In the comparatively
>> simple examples of WebGL use that I have seen so far ALL the assets and
>> the scenegraph are downloaded to the browser and in plain-text as well!
>> Does anyone have any thoughts about how content ownership rights might
>> be protected? I see this as a critical issue for the widespread adoption
>> of WebGL as a platform for gaming.
>>     
>
> WebGL doesn't deal with this issue at all. This is a general web browser
issue, and even more generally an issue with any assets available on the
web. I'm not sure what the solutions are, but I'm sure many have thought
about solving them. One of the great things about WebGL being integrated
with the browser is that whatever solution is available there can be used by
WebGL.
>
>   
Thanks for your reply. I hope that my question is not considered to be 
outside the scope of this mailing list, but I do feel that it will be an 
important point as webgl is considered for more widespread adoption.

Personally, I don't think that the webgl specification should have any 
content management aspect to it.

I'm a firm believer in WebGL and also the openness of the web. I've 
actually spent some time thinking about how to solve the issue of rights 
management of 3D content as it becomes easier and easier to share it, 
and have some ideas - so far I'm favoring a business model approach 
rather than a technical approach. My original post was to see if anyone 
else who is working with or evaluating webgl had any thoughts about it. 
Rather obviously, if they do, and they think they've cracked the 
problem, they may not want to share it! However, I suspect as many 
others have found in other areas of web content creation that there is 
no simple solution.

If people feel that this isn't an appropriate forum for this discussion, 
then I'm happy to withdraw and confine any future questions to more 
technical topics.

Regards

Alan






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