1. Foreword

Copyright 2013-2021 The Khronos Group Inc.

This specification is protected by copyright laws and contains material proprietary to Khronos. Except as described by these terms, it or any components may not be reproduced, republished, distributed, transmitted, displayed, broadcast, or otherwise exploited in any manner without the express prior written permission of Khronos.

This specification has been created under the Khronos Intellectual Property Rights Policy, which is Attachment A of the Khronos Group Membership Agreement available at https://www.khronos.org/files/member_agreement.pdf. Khronos grants a conditional copyright license to use and reproduce the unmodified specification for any purpose, without fee or royalty, EXCEPT no licenses to any patent, trademark or other intellectual property rights are granted under these terms. Parties desiring to implement the specification and make use of Khronos trademarks in relation to that implementation, and receive reciprocal patent license protection under the Khronos IP Policy must become Adopters under the process defined by Khronos for this specification; see https://www.khronos.org/conformance/adopters/file-format-adopter-program.

Some parts of this Specification are non-normative through being explicitly identified as purely informative, and do not define requirements necessary for compliance and so are outside the Scope of this Specification.

Where this Specification includes normative references to external documents, only the specifically identified sections and functionality of those external documents are in Scope. Requirements defined by external documents not created by Khronos may contain contributions from non-members of Khronos not covered by the Khronos Intellectual Property Rights Policy.

Khronos makes no, and expressly disclaims any, representations or warranties, express or implied, regarding this specification, including, without limitation: merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, non-infringement of any intellectual property, correctness, accuracy, completeness, timeliness, and reliability. Under no circumstances will Khronos, or any of its Promoters, Contributors or Members, or their respective partners, officers, directors, employees, agents or representatives be liable for any damages, whether direct, indirect, special or consequential damages for lost revenues, lost profits, or otherwise, arising from or in connection with these materials.

Khronos® and Vulkan® are registered trademarks, and ANARI™, WebGL™, glTF™, NNEF™, OpenVX™, SPIR™, SPIR‑V™, SYCL™, OpenVG™ and 3D Commerce™ are trademarks of The Khronos Group Inc. OpenXR™ is a trademark owned by The Khronos Group Inc. and is registered as a trademark in China, the European Union, Japan and the United Kingdom. OpenCL™ is a trademark of Apple Inc. and OpenGL® is a registered trademark and the OpenGL ES™ and OpenGL SC™ logos are trademarks of Hewlett Packard Enterprise used under license by Khronos. ASTC is a trademark of ARM Holdings PLC. All other product names, trademarks, and/or company names are used solely for identification and belong to their respective owners.

2. Introduction

2.1. General

This document, referred to as the “glTF Specification” or just the “Specification” hereafter, describes the glTF file format.

glTF is an API-neutral runtime asset delivery format. glTF bridges the gap between 3D content creation tools and modern graphics applications by providing an efficient, extensible, interoperable format for the transmission and loading of 3D content.

2.2. Document Conventions

The glTF Specification is intended for use by both implementers of the asset exporters or converters (e.g., digital content creation tools) and application developers seeking to import or load glTF assets, forming a basis for interoperability between these parties.

Specification text can address either party; typically, the intended audience can be inferred from context, though some sections are defined to address only one of these parties.

Any requirements, prohibitions, recommendations, or options defined by normative terminology are imposed only on the audience of that text.

2.2.1. Normative Terminology and References

The key words MUST, MUST NOT, REQUIRED, SHALL, SHALL NOT, SHOULD, SHOULD NOT, RECOMMENDED, MAY, and OPTIONAL in this document are to be interpreted as described in BCP 14.

These key words are highlighted in the specification for clarity.

References to external documents are considered normative if the Specification uses any of the normative terms defined in this section to refer to them or their requirements, either as a whole or in part.

2.2.2. Informative Language

Some language in the specification is purely informative, intended to give background or suggestions to implementers or developers.

If an entire chapter or section contains only informative language, its title is suffixed with “(Informative)”. If not designated as informative, all chapters, sections, and appendices in this document are normative.

All Notes, Implementation notes, and Examples are purely informative.

2.2.3. Technical Terminology

The glTF Specification makes use of linear algebra terms such as axis, matrix, vector, etc. to identify certain math constructs and their behaviors as defined in the International Electrotechnical Vocabulary.

The glTF Specification makes use of common engineering and graphics terms such as image, buffer, texture, etc. to identify and describe certain glTF constructs and their attributes, states, and behaviors. This section defines the basic meanings of these terms in the context of the Specification. The Specification text provides fuller definitions of the terms and elaborates, extends, or clarifies the definitions. When a term defined in this section is used in normative language within the Specification, the definitions within the Specification govern and supersede any meanings the terms may have in other technical contexts (i.e. outside the Specification).

accessor

An object describing the number and the format of data elements stored in a binary buffer.

animation

An object describing the keyframe data, including timestamps, and the target property affected by it.

back-facing

See facingness.

buffer

An external or embedded resource that represents a linear array of bytes.

buffer view

An object that represents a range of a specific buffer, and optional metadata that controls how the buffer’s content is interpreted.

camera

An object defining the projection parameters that are used to render a scene.

facingness

A classification of a triangle as either front-facing or back-facing, depending on the orientation (winding order) of its vertices.

front-facing

See facingness.

image

A two dimensional array of pixels encoded as a standardized bitstream, such as PNG.

indexed geometry

A mesh primitive that uses a separate source of data (index values) to assemble the primitive’s topology.

linear blend skinning

A skinning method that computes a per-vertex transformation matrix as a linear weighted sum of transformation matrices of the designated nodes.

material

A parametrized approximation of visual properties of the real-world object being represented by a mesh primitive.

mesh

A collection of mesh primitives.

mesh primitive

An object binding indexed or non-indexed geometry with a material.

mipmap

A set of image representations consecutively reduced by the factor of 2 in each dimension.

morph target

An altered state of a mesh primitive defined as a set of difference values for its vertex attributes.

node

An object defining the hierarchy relations and the local transform of its content.

non-indexed geometry

A mesh primitive that uses linear order of vertex attribute values to assemble the primitive’s topology.

normal

A unit XYZ vector defining the perpendicular to the surface.

root node

A node that is not a child of any other node.

sampler

An object that controls how image data is sampled.

scene

An object containing a list of root nodes to render.

skinning

The process of computing and applying individual transforms for each vertex of a mesh primitive.

tangent

A unit XYZ vector defining a tangential direction on the surface.

texture

An object that combines an image and its sampler.

topology type

State that controls how vertices are assembled, e.g. as lists of triangles, strips of lines, etc.

vertex attribute

A property associated with a vertex.

winding order

The relative order in which vertices are defined within a triangle

wrapping

A process of selecting an image pixel based on normalized texture coordinates.

2.2.4. Normative References

The following documents are referenced by normative sections of the specification:

2.2.4.1. External Specifications
2.2.4.2. Media Type Registrations

2.3. Motivation and Design Goals (Informative)

glTF is an open interoperable 3D asset ‘transmission’ format that is compact, and efficient to process and render at runtime. glTF 2.0 is designed to be vendor- and runtime-neutral, usable by a wide variety of native and web-based engines and applications regardless of underlying platforms and 3D graphics APIs.

glTF’s focus on run-time efficiency is a different design goal than typical 3D ‘authoring’ formats. Authoring formats are typically more verbose, with higher processing overheads, to carry authoring data that is no longer needed after iterative design is complete. glTF is complementary to authoring formats, providing a common, interoperable distillation target for publishing 3D assets to a wide audience of end users.

A primary goal of glTF is to be deployable on a wide range of devices and platforms, including the web and mobile devices with limited processing and memory resources. glTF can be evolved, to keep pace with growing compute capabilities over time. This helps to foster broad industry consensus on 3D functionality that can be used ubiquitously, including Physically Based Rendering.

glTF combines an easily parsable JSON scene description with one or more binary resources representing geometry, animations, and other rich data. These binary resources can often be loaded directly into GPU buffers with no additional parsing or processing, combining the faithful preservation of full hierarchical scenes, nodes, meshes, cameras, materials, and animations with efficient delivery and fast loading.

glTF has been designed to meet the following goals:

  • Compact file sizes. The plain text glTF JSON file description is compact and rapid to parse. All large data such as geometry, textures and animations are stored in binary files that are significantly smaller than equivalent text representations.

  • Runtime-independence. glTF is purely an asset format and does not mandate any runtime behavior. This enables its use by any application for any purpose, including display using any rendering technology, up to and including path tracing renderers.

  • Complete 3D scene representation. Not restricted to single objects, glTF can represent entire scenes, including nodes, transformations, transform hierarchy, meshes, materials, cameras, and animations.

  • Extensibility. glTF is fully extensible, enabling the addition of both general-purpose and vendor-specific extensions, including geometry and texture compression. Widely adopted extensions may be considered for integration into future versions of the glTF specification.

The following are outside the scope of glTF 2.0:

  • glTF is not a streaming format. The binary data in glTF is inherently streamable, and the buffer design allows for fetching data incrementally, but there are no other streaming constructs in glTF 2.0.

  • glTF is not an authoring format. glTF deliberately does not retain 3D authoring information, in order to preserve runtime efficiency, however glTF files may be ingested by 3D authoring tools for remixing.

  • glTF is not intended to be human-readable, though by virtue of being represented in JSON, it is developer-friendly.

2.4. glTF Basics

A glTF asset is represented by:

  • A JSON-formatted file (.gltf) containing a full scene description: node hierarchy, materials, cameras, as well as descriptor information for meshes, animations, and other constructs.

  • Binary files (.bin) containing geometry, animation, and other buffer-based data.

  • Image files (.jpg, .png) containing texture images.

Binary and image resources MAY also be embedded directly in JSON using Data URI or stored side-by-side with JSON in GLB container.

A valid glTF asset MUST specify its version.

2.5. Versioning

Any updates made to the glTF Specification in a minor version MUST be backward and forward compatible. Backward compatibility means that any client implementation that supports loading a glTF 2.x asset will also be able to load a glTF 2.0 asset. Forward compatibility means that a client implementation that only supports glTF 2.0 can load glTF 2.x assets while gracefully ignoring any new features it does not understand.

A minor version update MAY introduce new features but MUST NOT change any previously existing behavior. Existing functionality MAY be deprecated in a minor version update, but it MUST NOT be removed.

Major version updates MAY be incompatible with previous versions.

2.6. File Extensions and Media Types

  • JSON glTF files SHOULD use .gltf extension and model/gltf+json Media Type.

  • glTF files stored in GLB container SHOULD use .glb extension and model/gltf-binary Media Type.

  • Files representing binary buffers SHOULD use either:

  • PNG images SHOULD use .png file extension with image/png Media Type;

    • PNG images SHOULD NOT contain animations, non-square pixel ratios, or embedded ICC profiles. Such features, if present, MUST be ignored by client implementations.

  • JPEG images SHOULD use .jpeg or .jpg file extensions with image/jpeg Media Type

    • JPEG images MUST be compatible with JPEG File Interchange Format.

    • JPEG images SHOULD NOT contain embedded ICC profiles. If present, embedded ICC profiles MUST be ignored by client implementations.

    • Exchangeable image file format (Exif) chunks MAY be ignored by client implementations.

      Implementation Note

      Certain Exif chunks, e.g., “Orientation”, may severely impact an asset’s portability.

2.7. JSON Encoding

Although glTF Specification does not define any subset of the JSON format, implementations SHOULD be aware of its peculiar properties that could affect asset interoperability.

  1. glTF JSON data SHOULD be written with UTF-8 encoding without BOM. This requirement is not applied when a glTF implementation does not control string encoding. glTF implementations SHOULD adhere to RFC 8259, Section 8.1. with regards to treating BOM presence.

  2. ASCII characters stored in glTF JSON SHOULD be written without JSON escaping.

    Example

    "buffer" instead of "\u0062\u0075\u0066\u0066\u0065\u0072".

  3. Non-ASCII characters stored in glTF JSON MAY be escaped.

    Example

    These two examples represent the same glTF JSON data.

    {
        "asset": {
            "version": "2.0"
        },
        "nodes": [
            {
                "name": "куб"
            },
            {
                "name": "立方體"
            }
        ]
    }
    {
        "asset": {
            "version": "2.0"
        },
        "nodes": [
            {
                "name": "\u043a\u0443\u0431"
            },
            {
                "name": "\u7acb\u65b9\u9ad4"
            }
        ]
    }
  4. Property names (keys) within JSON objects SHOULD be unique. glTF client implementations SHOULD override lexically preceding values for the same key.

  5. Some of glTF properties are defined as integers in the schema. Such values MAY be stored as decimals with a zero fractional part or by using exponent notation. Regardless of encoding, such properties MUST NOT contain any non-zero fractional value.

    Example

    100, 100.0, and 1e2 represent the same value. See RFC 8259, Section 6 for more details.

  6. Non-integer numbers SHOULD be written in a way that preserves original values when these numbers are read back, i.e., they SHOULD NOT be altered by JSON serialization / deserialization roundtrip.

    Implementation Note

    This is typically achieved with algorithms like Grisu2 used by common JSON libraries.

2.8. URIs

glTF assets use URIs or IRIs to reference buffers and image resources. Assets MAY contain at least these two URI types:

  • Data URIs that embed binary resources in the glTF JSON as defined by the RFC 2397. The Data URI’s mediatype field MUST match the encoded content.

    Implementation Note

    Base64 encoding used in Data URI increases the payload’s byte length by 33%.

  • Relative paths — path-noscheme or ipath-noscheme as defined by RFC 3986, Section 4.2 or RFC 3987, Section 2.2 — without scheme, authority, or parameters. Reserved characters (as defined by RFC 3986, Section 2.2. and RFC 3987, Section 2.2.) MUST be percent-encoded.

Paths with non-ASCII characters MAY be written as-is, with JSON string escaping, or with percent-encoding; all these options are valid. For example, the following three paths point to the same resource:

{
    "images": [
        {
            "uri": "grande_sphère.png"
        },
        {
            "uri": "grande_sph\u00E8re.png"
        },
        {
            "uri": "grande_sph%C3%A8re.png"
        }
    ]
}

Client implementations MAY optionally support additional URI components. For example http:// or file:// schemes, authorities, hostnames, absolute paths, and query or fragment parameters. Assets containing these additional URI components would be less portable.

Implementation Note

This allows the application to decide the best approach for delivery: if different assets share many of the same geometries, animations, or textures, separate files may be preferred to reduce the total amount of data requested. With separate files, applications may progressively load data and do not need to load data for parts of a model that are not visible. If an application cares more about single-file deployment, embedding data may be preferred even though it increases the overall size due to base64 encoding and does not support progressive or on-demand loading. Alternatively, an asset could use the GLB container to store JSON and binary data in one file without base64 encoding. See GLB File Format Specification for details.

URIs SHOULD undergo syntax-based normalization as defined by RFC 3986, Section 6.2.2, RFC 3987, Section 5.3.2, and applicable schema rules (e.g., RFC 7230, Section 2.7.3 for HTTP) on export and/or import.

Implementation Note

While the specification does not explicitly disallow non-normalized URIs, their use may be unsupported or lead to unwanted side-effects — such as security warnings or cache misses — on some platforms.

3. Concepts

3.1. General

The figure below shows relations between top-level arrays in a glTF asset. See the Properties Reference.

objects
Figure 1. glTF Object Hierarchy

3.2. Asset

Each glTF asset MUST have an asset property. The asset object MUST contain a version property that specifies the target glTF version of the asset. Additionally, an optional minVersion property MAY be used to specify the minimum glTF version support required to load the asset. The minVersion property allows asset creators to specify a minimum version that a client implementation MUST support in order to load the asset. This is very similar to the extensionsRequired concept described in Section 3.12, where an asset SHOULD NOT be loaded if the client does not support the specified extension. Additional metadata MAY be stored in optional properties such as generator or copyright. For example,

{
    "asset": {
        "version": "2.0",
        "generator": "collada2gltf@f356b99aef8868f74877c7ca545f2cd206b9d3b7",
        "copyright": "2017 (c) Khronos Group"
    }
}
Implementation Note

Client implementations should first check whether a minVersion property is specified and ensure both major and minor versions can be supported. If no minVersion is specified, then clients should check the version property and ensure the major version is supported. Clients that load GLB format should also check for the minVersion and version properties in the JSON chunk as the version specified in the GLB header only refers to the GLB container version.

3.3. Indices and Names

Entities of a glTF asset are referenced by their indices in corresponding arrays, e.g., a bufferView refers to a buffer by specifying the buffer’s index in buffers array. For example:

{
    "buffers": [
        {
            "byteLength": 1024,
            "uri": "path-to.bin"
        }
    ],
    "bufferViews": [
        {
            "buffer": 0,
            "byteLength": 512,
            "byteOffset": 0
        }
    ]
}

In this example, buffers and bufferViews arrays have only one element each. The bufferView refers to the buffer using the buffer’s index: "buffer": 0.

Indices MUST be non-negative integer numbers. Indices MUST always point to existing elements.

Whereas indices are used for internal glTF references, optional names are used for application-specific uses such as display. Any top-level glTF object MAY have a name string property for this purpose. These property values are not guaranteed to be unique as they are intended to contain values created when the asset was authored.

For property names, glTF usually uses camel case, likeThis.

3.4. Coordinate System and Units

glTF uses a right-handed coordinate system. glTF defines +Y as up, +Z as forward, and -X as right; the front of a glTF asset faces +Z.

coordinate system
Figure 2. glTF Coordinate System Orientation

The units for all linear distances are meters.

All angles are in radians.

Positive rotation is counterclockwise.

Red, Green, and Blue primary colors use Recommendation ITU-R BT.709 chromaticity coordinates.

Implementation Note

Chromaticity coordinates define the interpretation of each primary color channel of the color model. In the context of a typical display, color primaries describe the color of the red, green, and blue phosphors or filters. Unless a wide color gamut output is explicitly used, client implementations usually do not need to convert colors. Future specification versions or extensions may allow other color primaries (such as P3).

3.5. Scenes

3.5.1. Overview

glTF 2.0 assets MAY contain zero or more scenes, the set of visual objects to render. Scenes are defined in a scenes array. All nodes listed in scene.nodes array MUST be root nodes, i.e., they MUST NOT be listed in a node.children array of any node. The same root node MAY appear in multiple scenes.

An additional root-level property, scene (note singular), identifies which of the scenes in the array SHOULD be displayed at load time. When scene is undefined, client implementations MAY delay rendering until a particular scene is requested.

A glTF asset that does not contain any scenes SHOULD be treated as a library of individual entities such as materials or meshes.

The following example defines a glTF asset with a single scene that contains a single node.

{
    "nodes": [
        {
            "name": "singleNode"
        }
    ],
    "scenes": [
        {
            "name": "singleScene",
            "nodes": [
                0
            ]
        }
    ],
    "scene": 0
}

3.5.2. Nodes and Hierarchy

glTF assets MAY define nodes, that is, the objects comprising the scene to render.

Nodes MAY have transform properties, as described later.

Nodes are organized in a parent-child hierarchy known informally as the node hierarchy. A node is called a root node when it doesn’t have a parent.

The node hierarchy MUST be a set of disjoint strict trees. That is node hierarchy MUST NOT contain cycles and each node MUST have zero or one parent node.

The node hierarchy is defined using a node’s children property, as in the following example:

{
    "nodes": [
        {
            "name": "Car",
            "children": [1, 2, 3, 4]
        },
        {
            "name": "wheel_1"
        },
        {
            "name": "wheel_2"
        },
        {
            "name": "wheel_3"
        },
        {
            "name": "wheel_4"
        }
    ]
}

The node named Car has four children. Each of those nodes could in turn have its own children, creating a hierarchy of nodes.

3.5.3. Transformations

Any node MAY define a local space transform either by supplying a matrix property, or any of translation, rotation, and scale properties (also known as TRS properties). translation and scale are 3D vectors in the local coordinate system. rotation is a unit quaternion value, XYZW, in the local coordinate system, where W is the scalar.

When matrix is defined, it MUST be decomposable to TRS properties.

Implementation Note

Transformation matrices cannot skew or shear.

When a node is targeted for animation (referenced by an animation.channel.target), only TRS properties MAY be present; matrix MUST NOT be present.

To compose the local transformation matrix, TRS properties MUST be converted to matrices and postmultiplied in the T * R * S order; first the scale is applied to the vertices, then the rotation, and then the translation.

Implementation Note

Non-invertible transforms (e.g., scaling one axis to zero) could lead to lighting and/or visibility artifacts.

Implementation Note

When the scale is zero on all three axes (by node transform or by animated scale), implementations are free to optimize away rendering of the node’s mesh, and all of the node’s children’s meshes. This provides a mechanism to animate visibility. Skinned meshes must not use this optimization unless all of the joints in the skin are scaled to zero simultaneously.

The global transformation matrix of a node is the product of the global transformation matrix of its parent node and its own local transformation matrix. When the node has no parent node, its global transformation matrix is identical to its local transformation matrix.

In the example below, a node named Box defines non-default rotation and translation.

{
    "nodes": [
        {
            "name": "Box",
            "rotation": [
                0,
                0,
                0,
                1
            ],
            "scale": [
                1,
                1,
                1
            ],
            "translation": [
                -17.7082,
                -11.4156,
                2.0922
            ]
        }
    ]
}

The next example defines the transform for a node with attached camera using the matrix property rather than using the individual TRS values:

{
    "nodes": [
        {
            "name": "node-camera",
            "camera": 1,
            "matrix": [
                -0.99975,
                -0.00679829,
                0.0213218,
                0,
                0.00167596,
                0.927325,
                0.374254,
                0,
                -0.0223165,
                0.374196,
                -0.927081,
                0,
                -0.0115543,
                0.194711,
                -0.478297,
                1
            ]
        }
    ]
}

3.6. Binary Data Storage

3.6.1. Buffers and Buffer Views

3.6.1.1. Overview

A buffer is arbitrary data stored as a binary blob. The buffer MAY contain any combination of geometry, animation, skins, and images.

Binary blobs allow efficient creation of GPU buffers and textures since they require no additional parsing, except perhaps decompression.

glTF assets MAY have any number of buffer resources. Buffers are defined in the asset’s buffers array.

While there’s no hard upper limit on buffer’s size, glTF assets SHOULD NOT use buffers bigger than 253 bytes because some JSON parsers may be unable to parse their byteLength correctly. Buffers stored as GLB binary chunk have an implicit limit of 232-1 bytes.

All buffer data defined in this specification (i.e., geometry attributes, geometry indices, sparse accessor data, animation inputs and outputs, inverse bind matrices) MUST use little endian byte order.

The following example defines a buffer. The byteLength property specifies the size of the buffer file. The uri property is the URI to the buffer data.

{
   "buffers": [
       {
           "byteLength": 102040,
           "uri": "duck.bin"
       }
   ]
}

The byte length of the referenced resource MUST be greater than or equal to the buffer.byteLength property.

Buffer data MAY alternatively be embedded in the glTF file via data: URI with base64 encoding. When data: URI is used for buffer storage, its mediatype field MUST be set to application/octet-stream or application/gltf-buffer.

A buffer view represents a contiguous segment of data in a buffer, defined by a byte offset into the buffer specified in the byteOffset property and a total byte length specified by the byteLength property of the buffer view.

Buffer views used for images, vertex indices, vertex attributes, or inverse bind matrices MUST contain only one kind of data, i.e., the same buffer view MUST NOT be used both for vertex indices and vertex attributes.

When a buffer view is used by vertex indices or attribute accessors it SHOULD specify bufferView.target with a value of element array buffer or array buffer respectively.

Implementation Note

This allows client implementations to early designate each buffer view to a proper processing step, e.g, buffer views with vertex indices and attributes would be copied to the appropriate GPU buffers, while buffer views with image data would be passed to format-specific image decoders.

The bufferView.target value uses integer enums defined in the Properties Reference.

The following example defines two buffer views: the first holds the indices for an indexed triangle set, and the second holds the vertex data for the triangle set.

{
    "bufferViews": [
        {
            "buffer": 0,
            "byteLength": 25272,
            "byteOffset": 0,
            "target": 34963
        },
        {
            "buffer": 0,
            "byteLength": 76768,
            "byteOffset": 25272,
            "byteStride": 32,
            "target": 34962
        }
    ]
}

When a buffer view is used for vertex attribute data, it MAY have a byteStride property. This property defines the stride in bytes between each vertex. Buffer views with other types of data MUST NOT not define byteStride (unless such layout is explicitly enabled by an extension).

Buffers and buffer views do not contain type information. They simply define the raw data for retrieval from the file. Objects within the glTF asset (meshes, skins, animations) access buffers or buffer views via accessors.

3.6.1.2. GLB-stored Buffer

The glTF asset MAY use the GLB file container to pack glTF JSON and one glTF buffer into one file. Data for such a buffer is provided via the GLB-stored BIN chunk.

A buffer with data provided by the GLB-stored BIN chunk, MUST be the first element of buffers array and it MUST have its buffer.uri property undefined. When such a buffer exists, a BIN chunk MUST be present.

Any glTF buffer with undefined buffer.uri property that is not the first element of buffers array does not refer to the GLB-stored BIN chunk, and the behavior of such buffers is left undefined to accommodate future extensions and specification versions.

The byte length of the BIN chunk MAY be up to 3 bytes bigger than JSON-defined buffer.byteLength value to satisfy GLB padding requirements.

Implementation Note

Not requiring strict equality of chunk’s and buffer’s lengths slightly simplifies glTF to GLB conversion: buffer.byteLength does not need to be updated after applying GLB padding.

In the following example, the first buffer object refers to GLB-stored data, while the second points to external resource:

{
    "buffers": [
        {
            "byteLength": 35884
        },
        {
            "byteLength": 504,
            "uri": "external.bin"
        }
  ]
}

See GLB File Format Specification for details on GLB File Format.

3.6.2. Accessors

3.6.2.1. Overview

All binary data for meshes, skins, and animations is stored in buffers and retrieved via accessors.

An accessor defines a method for retrieving data as typed arrays from within a buffer view. The accessor specifies a component type (e.g., float) and a data type (e.g., VEC3 for 3D vectors), which when combined define the complete data type for each data element. The number of elements is specified using the count property. Elements could be, e.g., vertex indices, vertex attributes, animation keyframes, etc.

The byteOffset property specifies the location of the first data element within the referenced buffer view. If the accessor is used for vertex attributes (i.e., it is referenced by a mesh primitive or its morph targets), the locations of the subsequent data elements are controlled by the bufferView.byteStride property. If the accessor is used for any other kind of data (vertex indices, animation keyframes, etc.), its data elements are tightly packed.

All accessors are stored in the asset’s accessors array.

The following example shows two accessors, the first is a scalar accessor for retrieving a primitive’s indices, and the second is a 3-float-component vector accessor for retrieving the primitive’s position data.

{
    "accessors": [
        {
            "bufferView": 0,
            "byteOffset": 0,
            "componentType": 5123,
            "count": 12636,
            "max": [
                4212
            ],
            "min": [
                0
            ],
            "type": "SCALAR"
        },
        {
            "bufferView": 1,
            "byteOffset": 0,
            "componentType": 5126,
            "count": 2399,
            "max": [
                0.961799,
                1.6397,
                0.539252
            ],
            "min": [
                -0.692985,
                0.0992937,
                -0.613282
            ],
            "type": "VEC3"
        }
    ]
}
3.6.2.2. Accessor Data Types
componentType Data Type Signed Bits

5120

signed byte

Signed, two’s complement

8

5121

unsigned byte

Unsigned

8

5122

signed short

Signed, two’s complement

16

5123

unsigned short

Unsigned

16

5125

unsigned int

Unsigned

32

5126

float

Signed

32

Signed 32-bit integer components are not supported.

Floating-point data MUST use IEEE-754 single precision format.

Values of NaN, +Infinity, and -Infinity MUST NOT be present.

type Number of components

"SCALAR"

1

"VEC2"

2

"VEC3"

3

"VEC4"

4

"MAT2"

4

"MAT3"

9

"MAT4"

16

Element size, in bytes, is (size in bytes of the 'componentType') * (number of components defined by 'type').

For example:

{
    "accessors": [
        {
            "bufferView": 1,
            "byteOffset": 7032,
            "componentType": 5126,
            "count": 585,
            "type": "VEC3"
        }
    ]
}

In this accessor, the componentType is 5126 (float), so each component is four bytes. The type is "VEC3", so there are three components. The size of each element is 12 bytes (4 * 3). Thus, the accessor takes 7020 bytes ([7032 …​ 14051] inclusive range of the buffer view).

3.6.2.3. Sparse Accessors

Sparse encoding of arrays is often more memory-efficient than dense encoding when describing incremental changes with respect to a reference array. This is often the case when encoding morph targets (it is, in general, more efficient to describe a few displaced vertices in a morph target than transmitting all morph target vertices).

Similar to a standard accessor, a sparse accessor initializes an array of typed elements from data stored in a bufferView. When accessor.bufferView is undefined, the sparse accessor is initialized as an array of zeros of size (size of the accessor element) * (accessor.count) bytes.

On top of that, a sparse accessor includes a sparse JSON object describing the elements that are different from their initialization values. The sparse object contains the following REQUIRED properties:

  • count: number of displaced elements. This number MUST NOT be greater than the number of the base accessor elements.

  • indices: object describing the location and the component type of indices of values to be replaced. The indices MUST form a strictly increasing sequence. The indices MUST NOT be greater than or equal to the number of the base accessor elements.

  • values: object describing the location of displaced elements corresponding to the indices referred from the indices.

The following example shows an example of a sparse accessor with 10 elements that are different from the initialization array.

{
    "accessors": [
        {
            "bufferView": 0,
            "byteOffset": 0,
            "componentType": 5123,
            "count": 12636,
            "type": "VEC3",
            "sparse": {
                "count": 10,
                "indices": {
                    "bufferView": 1,
                    "byteOffset": 0,
                    "componentType": 5123
                },
                "values": {
                    "bufferView": 2,
                    "byteOffset": 0
                }
            }
        }
    ]
}
3.6.2.4. Data Alignment

The offset of an accessor into a bufferView (i.e., accessor.byteOffset) and the offset of an accessor into a buffer (i.e., accessor.byteOffset + bufferView.byteOffset) MUST be a multiple of the size of the accessor’s component type.

When byteStride of the referenced bufferView is not defined, it means that accessor elements are tightly packed, i.e., effective stride equals the size of the element. When byteStride is defined, it MUST be a multiple of the size of the accessor’s component type.

When two or more vertex attribute accessors use the same bufferView, its byteStride MUST be defined.

Each accessor MUST fit its bufferView, i.e.,

accessor.byteOffset + EFFECTIVE_BYTE_STRIDE * (accessor.count - 1) + SIZE_OF_COMPONENT * NUMBER_OF_COMPONENTS

MUST be less than or equal to bufferView.length.

For performance and compatibility reasons, each element of a vertex attribute MUST be aligned to 4-byte boundaries inside a bufferView (i.e., accessor.byteOffset and bufferView.byteStride MUST be multiples of 4).

Accessors of matrix type have data stored in column-major order; start of each column MUST be aligned to 4-byte boundaries. Specifically, when ROWS * SIZE_OF_COMPONENT (where ROWS is the number of rows of the matrix) is not a multiple of 4, then (ROWS * SIZE_OF_COMPONENT) % 4 padding bytes MUST be inserted at the end of each column.

Only the following three accessor configurations require padding.

padding mat2 1byte
Figure 3. Matrix 2x2, 1-byte Components
padding mat3 1byte
Figure 4. Matrix 3x3, 1-byte Components
padding mat3 2byte
Figure 5. Matrix 3x3, 2-byte Components

Alignment requirements apply only to the start of each column, so trailing bytes MAY be omitted if there’s no further data.

Implementation Note

Alignment requirements allow client implementations to more efficiently process binary buffers because creating aligned data views usually does not require extra copying.

Consider the following example:

{
    "bufferViews": [
        {
            "buffer": 0,
            "byteLength": 17136,
            "byteOffset": 620
        }
    ],
    "accessors": [
        {
            "bufferView": 0,
            "byteOffset": 4608,
            "componentType": 5123,
            "count": 42,
            "type": "VEC2"
        }
    ]
}

In this example, the accessor describes tightly-packed two-component unsigned short values.

The corresponding segment of the underlying buffer would start from byte 5228

start = accessor.byteOffset + accessor.bufferView.byteOffset

and continue until byte 5396 exclusive

end = 2 * 2 * accessor.count + start

The unsigned short view for the resulting buffer range could be created without copying: 84 scalar values starting from byte offset 5228.

When accessor values are not tightly-packed (i.e., bufferView.byteStride is greater than element’s byte length), iteration over the created data view would need to take interleaved values into account (i.e., skip them).

3.6.2.5. Accessors Bounds

accessor.min and accessor.max properties are arrays that contain per-component minimum and maximum values, respectively. The length of these arrays MUST be equal to the number of accessor’s components.

Values stored in glTF JSON MUST match actual minimum and maximum binary values stored in buffers. The accessor.normalized flag has no effect on these properties.

A sparse accessor min and max properties correspond, respectively, to the minimum and maximum component values once the sparse substitution is applied.

When neither sparse nor bufferView is defined, min and max properties MAY have any values. This is intended for use cases when binary data is supplied by external means (e.g., via extensions).

For floating-point components, JSON-stored minimum and maximum values represent single precision floats and SHOULD be rounded to single precision before usage to avoid any potential boundary mismatches.

ECMAScript Implementation Note

Math.fround function could be used to achieve that.

Animation input and vertex position attribute accessors MUST have accessor.min and accessor.max defined. For all other accessors, these properties are optional.

3.7. Geometry

3.7.1. Overview

Any node MAY contain one mesh, defined in its mesh property. The mesh MAY be skinned using information provided in a referenced skin object. The mesh MAY have morph targets.

3.7.2. Meshes

3.7.2.1. Overview

Meshes are defined as arrays of primitives. Primitives correspond to the data required for GPU draw calls. Primitives specify one or more attributes, corresponding to the vertex attributes used in the draw calls. Indexed primitives also define an indices property. Attributes and indices are defined as references to accessors containing corresponding data. Each primitive MAY also specify a material and a mode that corresponds to the GPU topology type (e.g., triangle set).

Implementation Note

Splitting one mesh into several primitives can be useful to limit the number of indices per draw call or to assign different materials to different parts of the mesh.

If material is undefined, then a default material MUST be used.

The following example defines a mesh containing one indexed triangle primitive:

{
    "meshes": [
        {
            "primitives": [
                {
                    "attributes": {
                        "NORMAL": 23,
                        "POSITION": 22,
                        "TANGENT": 24,
                        "TEXCOORD_0": 25
                    },
                    "indices": 21,
                    "material": 3,
                    "mode": 4
                }
            ]
        }
    ]
}

Each attribute is defined as a property of the attributes object. The name of the property corresponds to an enumerated value identifying the vertex attribute, such as POSITION. The value of the property is the index of an accessor that contains the data.

The specification defines the following attribute semantics: POSITION, NORMAL, TANGENT, TEXCOORD_n, COLOR_n, JOINTS_n, and WEIGHTS_n.

Application-specific attribute semantics MUST start with an underscore, e.g., _TEMPERATURE. Application-specific attribute semantics MUST NOT use unsigned int component type.

Valid accessor type and component type for each attribute semantic property are defined below.

Name Accessor Type(s) Component Type(s) Description

POSITION

VEC3

float

Unitless XYZ vertex positions

NORMAL

VEC3

float

Normalized XYZ vertex normals

TANGENT

VEC4

float

XYZW vertex tangents where the XYZ portion is normalized, and the W component is a sign value (-1 or +1) indicating handedness of the tangent basis

TEXCOORD_n

VEC2

float
unsigned byte normalized
unsigned short normalized

ST texture coordinates

COLOR_n

VEC3
VEC4

float
unsigned byte normalized
unsigned short normalized

RGB or RGBA vertex color linear multiplier

JOINTS_n

VEC4

unsigned byte unsigned short

See Skinned Mesh Attributes

WEIGHTS_n

VEC4

float
unsigned byte normalized
unsigned short normalized

See Skinned Mesh Attributes

POSITION accessor MUST have its min and max properties defined.

The W component of each TANGENT accessor element MUST be set to 1.0 or -1.0.

When a COLOR_n attribute uses an accessor of "VEC3" type, its alpha component MUST be assumed to have a value of 1.0.

All components of each COLOR_0 accessor element MUST be clamped to [0.0, 1.0] range.

TEXCOORD_n, COLOR_n, JOINTS_n, and WEIGHTS_n attribute semantic property names MUST be of the form [semantic]_[set_index], e.g., TEXCOORD_0, TEXCOORD_1, COLOR_0. All indices for indexed attribute semantics MUST start with 0 and be consecutive positive integers: TEXCOORD_0, TEXCOORD_1, etc. Indices MUST NOT use leading zeroes to pad the number of digits (e.g., TEXCOORD_01 is not allowed).

Client implementations SHOULD support at least two texture coordinate sets, one vertex color, and one joints/weights set.

All attribute accessors for a given primitive MUST have the same count. When indices property is not defined, attribute accessors' count indicates the number of vertices to render; when indices property is defined, it indicates the upper (exclusive) bound on the index values in the indices accessor, i.e., all index values MUST be less than attribute accessors' count.

indices accessor MUST NOT contain the maximum possible value for the component type used (i.e., 255 for unsigned bytes, 65535 for unsigned shorts, 4294967295 for unsigned ints).

Implementation Note

The maximum values trigger primitive restart in some graphics APIs and would require client implementations to rebuild the index buffer.

When indices property is not defined, the number of vertex indices to render is defined by count of attribute accessors (with the implied values from range [0..count)); when indices property is defined, the number of vertex indices to render is defined by count of accessor referred to by indices. In either case, the number of vertex indices MUST be valid for the topology type used:

  • For points, it MUST be non-zero.

  • For line loops and line strips, it MUST be 2 or greater.

  • For triangle strips and triangle fans, it MUST be 3 or greater.

  • For lines, it MUST be divisible by 2 and non-zero.

  • For triangles, it MUST be divisible by 3 and non-zero

Topology types are defined as follows.

  • Points

    Each vertex defines a single point primitive, according to the equation:

    pi = {vi}

  • Line Strips

    One line primitive is defined by each vertex and the following vertex, according to the equation:

    pi = {vi, vi+1}

  • Line Loops

    Loops are the same as line strips except that a final segment is added from the final specified vertex to the first vertex.

  • Lines

    Each consecutive pair of vertices defines a single line primitive, according to the equation:

    pi = {v2i, v2i+1}

  • Triangles

    Each consecutive set of three vertices defines a single triangle primitive, according to the equation:

    pi = {v3i, v3i+1, v3i+2}

  • Triangle Strips

    One triangle primitive is defined by each vertex and the two vertices that follow it, according to the equation:

    pi = {vi, vi+(1+i%2), vi+(2-i%2)}

  • Triangle Fans

    Triangle primitives are defined around a shared common vertex, according to the equation:

    pi = {vi+1, vi+2, v0}

Mesh geometry SHOULD NOT contain degenerate lines or triangles, i.e., lines or triangles that use the same vertex more than once per topology primitive.

When positions are not specified, client implementations SHOULD skip primitive’s rendering unless its positions are provided by other means (e.g., by an extension). This applies to both indexed and non-indexed geometry.

When tangents are not specified, client implementations SHOULD calculate tangents using default MikkTSpace algorithms with the specified vertex positions, normals, and texture coordinates associated with the normal texture.

When normals are not specified, client implementations MUST calculate flat normals and the provided tangents (if present) MUST be ignored.

Vertices of the same triangle SHOULD have the same tangent.w value. When vertices of the same triangle have different tangent.w values, its tangent space is considered undefined.

The bitangent vectors MUST be computed by taking the cross product of the normal and tangent XYZ vectors and multiplying it against the W component of the tangent: bitangent = cross(normal.xyz, tangent.xyz) * tangent.w.

Extensions MAY add additional attribute names, accessor types, and/or component types.

3.7.2.2. Morph Targets

Morph targets are defined by extending the Mesh concept.

A morph target is a morphable Mesh where the primitives' attributes are obtained by adding the original attributes to a weighted sum of the target’s attributes.

For instance, the morph target vertices POSITION for the primitive at index i are computed in this way:

primitives[i].attributes.POSITION +
  weights[0] * primitives[i].targets[0].POSITION +
  weights[1] * primitives[i].targets[1].POSITION +
  weights[2] * primitives[i].targets[2].POSITION + ...

Morph targets are specified via the targets property defined in the Mesh primitives. Each target in the targets array is a plain JSON object mapping a primitive attribute to an accessor containing morph target displacement data (deltas).

For each morph target attribute, an original attribute MUST be present in the mesh primitive.

Attributes present in the base mesh primitive but not included in a given morph target MUST retain their original values for the morph target.

Implementation Note

This allows skipping zero-filled accessors and implies that different morph targets may contain different sets of attributes.

Client implementations SHOULD support at least three attributes — POSITION, NORMAL, and TANGENT — for morphing. Client implementations MAY optionally support morphed TEXCOORD_n and/or COLOR_n attributes.

If morph targets contain application-specific semantics, their names MUST be prefixed with an underscore (e.g., _TEMPERATURE) like the associated attribute semantics.

All primitives MUST have the same number of morph targets in the same order.

Accessor type and component type for each morphed attribute semantic property MUST follow the table below. Note that the W component for handedness is omitted when targeting TANGENT data since handedness cannot be displaced.

Name Accessor Type(s) Component Type(s) Description

POSITION

VEC3

float

XYZ vertex position displacements

NORMAL

VEC3

float

XYZ vertex normal displacements

TANGENT

VEC3

float

XYZ vertex tangent displacements

TEXCOORD_n

VEC2

float
signed byte normalized
signed short normalized
unsigned byte normalized
unsigned short normalized

ST texture coordinate displacements

COLOR_n

VEC3
VEC4

float
signed byte normalized
signed short normalized
unsigned byte normalized
unsigned short normalized

RGB or RGBA color deltas

POSITION accessor MUST have its min and max properties defined.

Displacements for POSITION, NORMAL, and TANGENT attributes MUST be applied before any transformation matrices affecting the mesh vertices such as skinning or node transforms.

When the base mesh primitive does not specify tangents, client implementations SHOULD calculate tangents for each morph target using default MikkTSpace algorithms with the updated vertex positions, normals, and texture coordinates associated with the normal texture.

When the base mesh primitive does not specify normals, client implementations MUST calculate flat normals for each morph target; the provided tangents and their displacements (if present) MUST be ignored.

When COLOR_n deltas use an accessor of "VEC3" type, their alpha components MUST be assumed to have a value of 0.0.

After applying color deltas, all components of each COLOR_0 morphed accessor element MUST be clamped to [0.0, 1.0] range.

All morph target accessors MUST have the same count as the accessors of the original primitive.

A mesh with morph targets MAY also define an optional mesh.weights property that stores the default targets' weights. These weights MUST be used when node.weights is undefined. When mesh.weights is undefined, the default targets' weights are zeros.

The following example extends the Mesh defined in the previous example to a morphable one by adding two morph targets:

{
    "primitives": [
        {
            "attributes": {
                "NORMAL": 23,
                "POSITION": 22,
                "TANGENT": 24,
                "TEXCOORD_0": 25
            },
            "indices": 21,
            "material": 3,
            "targets": [
                {
                    "NORMAL": 33,
                    "POSITION": 32,
                    "TANGENT": 34
                },
                {
                    "NORMAL": 43,
                    "POSITION": 42,
                    "TANGENT": 44
                }
            ]
        }
    ],
    "weights": [0, 0.5]
}

The number of morph targets is not limited. Client implementations SHOULD support at least eight morphed attributes. This means that they SHOULD support eight morph targets when each morph target has one attribute, four morph targets where each morph target has two attributes, or two morph targets where each morph target has three or four attributes.

For assets that contain a higher number of morphed attributes, client implementations MAY choose to only use the eight attributes of the morph targets with the highest weights.

Implementation Note

A significant number of authoring and client implementations associate names with morph targets. While the glTF 2.0 specification currently does not provide a way to specify names, most tools use an array of strings, mesh.extras.targetNames, for this purpose. The targetNames array and all primitive targets arrays must have the same length.

3.7.3. Skins

3.7.3.1. Overview

glTF 2.0 meshes support Linear Blend Skinning via skin objects, joint hierarchies, and designated vertex attributes.

Skins are stored in the skins array of the asset. Each skin is defined by a REQUIRED joints property that lists the indices of nodes used as joints to pose the skin and an OPTIONAL inverseBindMatrices property that points to an accessor with inverse bind matrices data used to bring coordinates being skinned into the same space as each joint.

The order of joints is defined by the skin.joints array and it MUST match the order of inverseBindMatrices accessor elements (when the latter is present). The skeleton property (if present) points to the node that is the common root of a joints hierarchy or to a direct or indirect parent node of the common root.

Implementation Note

Although the skeleton property is not needed for computing skinning transforms, it may be used to provide a specific “pivot point” for the skinned geometry.

An accessor referenced by inverseBindMatrices MUST have floating-point components of "MAT4" type. The number of elements of the accessor referenced by inverseBindMatrices MUST greater than or equal to the number of joints elements. The fourth row of each matrix MUST be set to [0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0].

Implementation Note

The matrix defining how to pose the skin’s geometry for use with the joints (also known as “Bind Shape Matrix”) should be premultiplied to mesh data or to Inverse Bind Matrices.

3.7.3.2. Joint Hierarchy

The joint hierarchy used for controlling skinned mesh pose is simply the node hierarchy, with each node designated as a joint by a reference from the skin.joints array. Each skin’s joints MUST have a common parent node (direct or indirect) called common root, which may or may not be a joint node itself. When a skin is referenced by a node within a scene, the common root MUST belong to the same scene.

Implementation Note

A node object does not specify whether it is a joint. Client implementations may need to traverse the skins array first, marking each joint node.

A joint node MAY have other nodes attached to it, even a complete node sub graph with meshes.

Implementation Note

It’s common to have an entire geometry attached to a joint node without having it being skinned (e.g., a sword attached to a hand). Note that the node transform is the local transform of the node relative to the joint, like any other node in the glTF node hierarchy as described in the Transformations section.

Only the joint transforms are applied to the skinned mesh; the transform of the skinned mesh node MUST be ignored.

In the example below, the translation of node_0 and the scale of node_1 are applied while the translation of node_3 and rotation of node_4 are ignored.

{
    "nodes": [
        {
            "name": "node_0",
            "children": [ 1 ],
            "translation": [ 0.0, 1.0, 0.0 ]
        },
        {
            "name": "node_1",
            "children": [ 2 ],
            "scale": [ 0.5, 0.5, 0.5 ]
        },
        {
            "name": "node_2"
        },
        {
            "name": "node_3",
            "children": [ 4 ],
            "translation": [ 1.0, 0.0, 0.0 ]
        },
        {
            "name": "node_4",
            "mesh": 0,
            "rotation": [ 0.0, 1.0, 0.0, 0.0 ],
            "skin": 0
        }
    ],
    "skins": [
        {
            "inverseBindMatrices": 0,
            "joints": [ 1, 2 ],
            "skeleton": 1
        }
    ]
}
3.7.3.3. Skinned Mesh Attributes

The skinned mesh MUST have vertex attributes that are used in skinning calculations. The JOINTS_n attribute data contains the indices of the joints from the corresponding skin.joints array that affect the vertex. The WEIGHTS_n attribute data defines the weights indicating how strongly the joint influences the vertex.

To apply skinning, a transformation matrix is computed for each joint. Then, the per-vertex transformation matrices are computed as weighted linear sums of the joint transformation matrices. Note that per-joint inverse bind matrices (when present) MUST be applied before the base node transforms.

In the following example, a mesh primitive defines JOINTS_0 and WEIGHTS_0 vertex attributes:

{
    "meshes": [
        {
            "name": "skinned-mesh_1",
            "primitives": [
                {
                    "attributes": {
                        "JOINTS_0": 179,
                        "NORMAL": 165,
                        "POSITION": 163,
                        "TEXCOORD_0": 167,
                        "WEIGHTS_0": 176
                    },
                    "indices": 161,
                    "material": 1,
                    "mode": 4
                }
            ]
        }
    ]
}

The number of joints that influence one vertex is limited to 4 per set, so the referenced accessors MUST have VEC4 type and following component types:

  • JOINTS_n: unsigned byte or unsigned short

  • WEIGHTS_n: float, or normalized unsigned byte, or normalized unsigned short

The joint weights for each vertex MUST NOT be negative.

Joints MUST NOT contain more than one non-zero weight for a given vertex.

When the weights are stored using float component type, their linear sum SHOULD be as close as reasonably possible to 1.0 for a given vertex.

When the weights are stored using normalized unsigned byte, or normalized unsigned short component types, their linear sum before normalization MUST be 255 or 65535 respectively. Without these requirements, vertices would be deformed significantly because the weight error would get multiplied by the joint position. For example, an error of 1/255 in the weight sum would result in an unacceptably large difference in the joint position.

Implementation Note

The threshold in the official validation tool is set to 2e-7 times the number of non-zero weights per vertex.

Implementation Note

Since the allowed threshold is much lower than minimum possible step for quantized component types, weight sum should be renormalized after quantization.

When any of the vertices are influenced by more than four joints, the additional joint and weight information are stored in subsequent sets. For example, JOINTS_1 and WEIGHTS_1 if present will reference the accessor for up to 4 additional joints that influence the vertices. For a given primitive, the number of JOINTS_n attribute sets MUST be equal to the number of WEIGHTS_n attribute sets.

Client implementations MAY support only a single set of up to four weights and joints, however not supporting all weight and joint sets present in the file may have an impact on the asset’s animation.

All joint values MUST be within the range of joints in the skin. Unused joint values (i.e., joints with a weight of zero) SHOULD be set to zero.

3.7.4. Instantiation

A mesh is instantiated by node.mesh property. The same mesh could be used by many nodes, which could have different transforms. For example:

{
    "nodes": [
        {
            "mesh": 11
        },
        {
            "mesh": 11,
            "translation": [
                -20,
                -1,
                0
            ]
        }
    ]
}

After applying the node’s global transform, mesh vertex position values are meters.

When a mesh primitive uses any triangle-based topology (i.e., triangles, triangle strip, or triangle fan), the determinant of the node’s global transform defines the winding order of that primitive. If the determinant is a positive value, the winding order triangle faces is counterclockwise; in the opposite case, the winding order is clockwise.

Implementation Note

Switching the winding order to clockwise enables mirroring geometry via negative scale transforms.

When an instantiated mesh has morph targets, it MUST use morph weights specified with the node.weights property. When the latter is undefined, mesh.weights property MUST be used instead. When both of these fields are undefined, the mesh is instantiated in a non-morphed state (i.e., with all morph weights set to zeros).

The example below instantiates a Morph Target with non-default weights.

{
    "nodes": [
        {
            "mesh": 11,
            "weights": [0, 0.5]
        }
    ]
}

A skin is instantiated within a node using a combination of the node’s mesh and skin properties. The mesh for a skin instance is defined in the mesh property. The skin property contains the index of the skin to instance.

The following example shows a skinned mesh instance: a skin object, a node with a skinned mesh, and two joint nodes.

{
    "skins": [
        {
            "inverseBindMatrices": 29,
            "joints": [1, 2]
        }
    ],
    "nodes": [
        {
            "name":"Skinned mesh node",
            "mesh": 0,
            "skin": 0
        },
        {
            "name":"Skeleton root joint",
            "children": [2],
            "rotation": [
                0,
                0,
                0.7071067811865475,
                0.7071067811865476
            ],
            "translation": [
                4.61599,
                -2.032e-06,
                -5.08e-08
            ]
        },
        {
            "name":"Head",
            "translation": [
                8.76635,
                0,
                0
            ]
        }
    ]
}

3.8. Texture Data

3.8.1. Overview

glTF 2.0 separates texture access into three distinct types of objects: Textures, Images, and Samplers.

3.8.2. Textures

Textures are stored in the asset’s textures array. A texture is defined by an image index, denoted by the source property and a sampler index (sampler). For example:

{
    "textures": [
        {
            "sampler": 0,
            "source": 2
        }
    ]
}

glTF 2.0 supports only static 2D textures.

When texture.source is undefined, the image SHOULD be provided by an extension or application-specific means, otherwise the texture object is undefined.

Implementation Note

Client implementations may render such textures with a predefined placeholder image or being filled with some error color (usually magenta).

When texture.sampler is undefined, a sampler with repeat wrapping (in both directions) and auto filtering MUST be used.

3.8.3. Images

Images referred to by textures are stored in the images array of the asset.

Each image contains one of

  • a URI (or IRI) to an external file in one of the supported image formats, or

  • a Data URI with embedded data, or

  • a reference to a bufferView; in that case mimeType MUST be defined.

The following example shows an image pointing to an external PNG image file and another image referencing a bufferView with JPEG data.

{
    "images": [
        {
            "uri": "duckCM.png"
        },
        {
            "bufferView": 14,
            "mimeType": "image/jpeg"
        }
    ]
}

Client implementations MAY need to manually determine the media type of some images. In such a case, the following table SHOULD be used to check the values of the first few bytes.

Media Type Pattern Length Pattern Bytes

image/png

8

0x89 0x50 0x4E 0x47 0x0D 0x0A 0x1A 0x0A

image/jpeg

3

0xFF 0xD8 0xFF

The image data MUST match the image.mimeType property when the latter is defined.

The origin of the texture coordinates (0, 0) corresponds to the upper left corner of a texture image. This is illustrated in the following figure, where the respective coordinates are shown for all four corners of a normalized texture space:

texcoords
Figure 6. Normalized Texture Coordinates

Any colorspace information (such as ICC profiles, intents, gamma values, etc.) from PNG or JPEG images MUST be ignored. Effective transfer function (encoding) is defined by a glTF object that refers to the image (in most cases it’s a texture that is used by a material).

Web Implementation Note

To ignore embedded colorspace information when using WebGL API, set UNPACK_COLORSPACE_CONVERSION_WEBGL flag to NONE.

To ignore embedded colorspace information when using ImageBitmap API, set colorSpaceConversion option to none.

3.8.4. Samplers

3.8.4.1. Overview

Samplers are stored in the samplers array of the asset. Each sampler specifies filtering and wrapping modes.

The sampler properties use integer enums defined in the Properties Reference.

Client implementations SHOULD follow specified filtering modes. When the latter are undefined, client implementations MAY set their own default texture filtering settings.

Client implementations MUST follow specified wrapping modes.

3.8.4.2. Filtering

Filtering modes control texture’s magnification and minification.

Magnification modes include:

  • Nearest. For each requested texel coordinate, the sampler selects a texel with the nearest coordinates. This process is sometimes called “nearest neighbor”.

  • Linear. For each requested texel coordinate, the sampler computes a weighted sum of several adjacent texels. This process is sometimes called “bilinear interpolation”.

Minification modes include:

  • Nearest. For each requested texel coordinate, the sampler selects a texel with the nearest (in Manhattan distance) coordinates from the original image. This process is sometimes called “nearest neighbor”.

  • Linear. For each requested texel coordinate, the sampler computes a weighted sum of several adjacent texels from the original image. This process is sometimes called “bilinear interpolation”.

  • Nearest-mipmap-nearest. For each requested texel coordinate, the sampler first selects one of pre-minified versions of the original image, and then selects a texel with the nearest (in Manhattan distance) coordinates from it.

  • Linear-mipmap-nearest. For each requested texel coordinate, the sampler first selects one of pre-minified versions of the original image, and then computes a weighted sum of several adjacent texels from it.

  • Nearest-mipmap-linear. For each requested texel coordinate, the sampler first selects two pre-minified versions of the original image, selects a texel with the nearest (in Manhattan distance) coordinates from each of them, and performs final linear interpolation between these two intermediate results.

  • Linear-mipmap-linear. For each requested texel coordinate, the sampler first selects two pre-minified versions of the original image, computes a weighted sum of several adjacent texels from each of them, and performs final linear interpolation between these two intermediate results. This process is sometimes called “trilinear interpolation”.

To properly support mipmap modes, client implementations SHOULD generate mipmaps at runtime. When runtime mipmap generation is not possible, client implementations SHOULD override the minification filtering mode as follows:

Mipmap minification mode Fallback mode

Nearest-mipmap-nearest
Nearest-mipmap-linear

Nearest

Linear-mipmap-nearest
Linear-mipmap-linear

Linear

3.8.4.3. Wrapping

Per-vertex texture coordinates, which are provided via TEXCOORD_n attribute values, are normalized for the image size (not to confuse with the normalized accessor property, the latter refers only to data encoding). That is, the texture coordinate value of (0.0, 0.0) points to the beginning of the first (upper-left) image pixel, while the texture coordinate value of (1.0, 1.0) points to the end of the last (lower-right) image pixel.

Sampler’s wrapping modes define how to handle texture coordinates that are negative or greater than or equal to 1.0, independently for both directions. Supported modes include:

  • Repeat. Only the fractional part of texture coordinates is used.

    Example

    2.2 maps to 0.2; -0.4 maps to 0.6.

  • Mirrored Repeat. This mode works as repeat but flips the direction when the integer part (truncated towards −∞) is odd.

    Example

    2.2 maps to 0.2; -0.4 is treated as 0.4.

  • Clamp to edge. Texture coordinates with values outside the image are clamped to the closest existing image texel at the edge.

3.8.4.4. Example

The following example defines a sampler with linear magnification filtering, linear-mipmap-linear minification filtering, and repeat wrapping in both directions.

{
    "samplers": [
        {
            "magFilter": 9729,
            "minFilter": 9987,
            "wrapS": 10497,
            "wrapT": 10497
        }
    ]
}
3.8.4.5. Non-power-of-two Textures

Client implementations SHOULD resize non-power-of-two textures (so that their horizontal and vertical sizes are powers of two) when running on platforms that have limited support for such texture dimensions.

Implementation Note

Specifically, if the sampler the texture references:

  • has a wrapping mode (either wrapS or wrapT) equal to repeat or mirrored repeat, or

  • has a minification filter (minFilter) that uses mipmapping.

3.9. Materials

3.9.1. Overview

glTF defines materials using a common set of parameters that are based on widely used material representations from Physically Based Rendering (PBR). Specifically, glTF uses the metallic-roughness material model. Using this declarative representation of materials enables a glTF file to be rendered consistently across platforms.

materials
Figure 7. Physically Based Rendering Example

3.9.2. Metallic-Roughness Material

All parameters related to the metallic-roughness material model are defined under the pbrMetallicRoughness property of material object. The following example shows how to define a gold-like material using the metallic-roughness parameters:

{
    "materials": [
        {
            "name": "gold",
            "pbrMetallicRoughness": {
                "baseColorFactor": [ 1.000, 0.766, 0.336, 1.0 ],
                "metallicFactor": 1.0,
                "roughnessFactor": 0.0
            }
        }
    ]
}

The metallic-roughness material model is defined by the following properties:

  • base color - The base color of the material.

  • metalness - The metalness of the material; values range from 0.0 (non-metal) to 1.0 (metal); see Appendix B for the interpretation of intermediate values.

  • roughness - The roughness of the material; values range from 0.0 (smooth) to 1.0 (rough).

The base color has two different interpretations depending on the value of metalness. When the material is a metal, the base color is the specific measured reflectance value at normal incidence (F0). For a non-metal the base color represents the reflected diffuse color of the material. In this model it is not possible to specify a F0 value for non-metals, and a linear value of 4% (0.04) is used.

The value for each property MAY be defined using factors and/or textures (e.g., baseColorTexture and baseColorFactor). If a texture is not given, all respective texture components within this material model MUST be assumed to have a value of 1.0. If both factors and textures are present, the factor value acts as a linear multiplier for the corresponding texture values. A texture binding is defined by an index of a texture object and an optional index of texture coordinates.

The following example shows a material that uses a texture for its base color property.

{
    "materials": [
        {
            "pbrMetallicRoughness": {
                "baseColorTexture": {
                    "index": 0,
                    "texCoord": 1
                },
            }
        }
    ],
    "textures": [
        {
            "source": 0
        }
    ],
    "images": [
        {
            "uri": "base_color.png"
        }
    ]
}

The base color texture MUST contain 8-bit values encoded with the sRGB opto-electronic transfer function so RGB values MUST be decoded to real linear values before they are used for any computations. To achieve correct filtering, the transfer function SHOULD be decoded before performing linear interpolation.

The textures for metalness and roughness properties are packed together in a single texture called metallicRoughnessTexture. Its green channel contains roughness values and its blue channel contains metalness values. This texture MUST be encoded with linear transfer function and MAY use more than 8 bits per channel.

For example, assume an 8-bit RGBA value of [64, 124, 231, 255] is sampled from baseColorTexture and assume that baseColorFactor is given as [0.2, 1.0, 0.7, 1.0]. Then, the final base color value would be (after decoding the transfer function and multiplying by the factor)

[0.051 * 0.2, 0.202 * 1.0, 0.799 * 0.7, 1.0 * 1.0] = [0.0102, 0.202, 0.5593, 1.0]

In addition to the material properties, if a primitive specifies a vertex color using the attribute semantic property COLOR_0, then this value acts as an additional linear multiplier to base color.

Implementations of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) itself MAY vary based on device performance and resource constraints. See Appendix B for more details on the BRDF calculations.

3.9.3. Additional Textures

The material definition also provides for additional textures that MAY also be used with the metallic-roughness material model as well as other material models, which could be provided via glTF extensions.

The following additional textures are supported:

  • normal : A tangent space normal texture. The texture encodes XYZ components of a normal vector in tangent space as RGB values stored with linear transfer function. Normal textures SHOULD NOT contain alpha channel as it not used anyway. After dequantization, texel values MUST be mapped as follows: red [0.0 .. 1.0] to X [-1 .. 1], green [0.0 .. 1.0] to Y [-1 .. 1], blue (0.5 .. 1.0] maps to Z (0 .. 1]. Normal textures SHOULD NOT contain blue values less than or equal to 0.5.

    Implementation Note

    This mapping is usually implemented as sampledValue * 2.0 - 1.0.

    The texture binding for normal textures MAY additionally contain a scalar scale value that linearly scales X and Y components of the normal vector.

    Normal vectors MUST be normalized before being used in lighting equations. When scaling is used, vector normalization happens after scaling.

  • occlusion : The occlusion texture; it indicates areas that receive less indirect lighting from ambient sources. Direct lighting is not affected. The red channel of the texture encodes the occlusion value, where 0.0 means fully-occluded area (no indirect lighting) and 1.0 means not occluded area (full indirect lighting). Other texture channels (if present) do not affect occlusion.

    The texture binding for occlusion maps MAY optionally contain a scalar strength value that is used to reduce the occlusion effect. When present, it affects the occlusion value as 1.0 + strength * (occlusionTexture - 1.0).

  • emissive : The emissive texture and factor control the color and intensity of the light being emitted by the material. The texture MUST contain 8-bit values encoded with the sRGB opto-electronic transfer function so RGB values MUST be decoded to real linear values before they are used for any computations. To achieve correct filtering, the transfer function SHOULD be decoded before performing linear interpolation.

    For implementations where a physical light unit is needed, the units for the multiplicative product of the emissive texture and factor are candela per square meter (cd / m2), sometimes called nits.

    Implementation Note

    Because the value is specified per square meter, it indicates the brightness of any given point along the surface. However, the exact conversion from physical light units to the brightness of rendered pixels requires knowledge of the camera’s exposure settings, which are left as an implementation detail unless otherwise defined by a glTF extension.

    Many rendering engines simplify this calculation by assuming that an emissive factor of 1.0 results in a fully exposed pixel.

The following example shows a material that is defined using pbrMetallicRoughness parameters as well as additional textures:

{
    "materials": [
        {
            "name": "Material0",
            "pbrMetallicRoughness": {
                "baseColorFactor": [ 0.5, 0.5, 0.5, 1.0 ],
                "baseColorTexture": {
                    "index": 1,
                    "texCoord": 1
                },
                "metallicFactor": 1,
                "roughnessFactor": 1,
                "metallicRoughnessTexture": {
                    "index": 2,
                    "texCoord": 1
                }
            },
            "normalTexture": {
                "scale": 2,
                "index": 3,
                "texCoord": 1
            },
            "emissiveFactor": [ 0.2, 0.1, 0.0 ]
        }
    ]
}

If a client implementation is resource-bound and cannot support all the textures defined it SHOULD support these additional textures in the following priority order. Resource-bound implementations SHOULD drop textures from the bottom to the top.

Texture Rendering impact when feature is not supported

Normal

Geometry will appear less detailed than authored.

Occlusion

Model will appear brighter in areas that are intended to be darker.

Emissive

Model with lights will not be lit. For example, the headlights of a car model will be off instead of on.

3.9.4. Alpha Coverage

The alphaMode property defines how the alpha value is interpreted. The alpha value is taken from the fourth component of the base color for metallic-roughness material model.

alphaMode can be one of the following values:

  • OPAQUE - The rendered output is fully opaque and any alpha value is ignored.

  • MASK - The rendered output is either fully opaque or fully transparent depending on the alpha value and the specified alpha cutoff value; the exact appearance of the edges MAY be subject to implementation-specific techniques such as “Alpha-to-Coverage”.

    Note

    This mode is used to simulate geometry such as tree leaves or wire fences.

  • BLEND - The rendered output is combined with the background using the “over” operator as described in Compositing digital images.

    Note

    This mode is used to simulate geometry such as gauze cloth or animal fur.

When alphaMode is set to MASK the alphaCutoff property specifies the cutoff threshold. If the alpha value is greater than or equal to the alphaCutoff value then it is rendered as fully opaque, otherwise, it is rendered as fully transparent. alphaCutoff value is ignored for other modes.

Implementation Note for Real-Time Rasterizers

Real-time rasterizers typically use depth buffers and mesh sorting to support alpha modes. The following describe the expected behavior for these types of renderers.

  • OPAQUE - A depth value is written for every pixel and mesh sorting is not required for correct output.

  • MASK - A depth value is not written for a pixel that is discarded after the alpha test. A depth value is written for all other pixels. Mesh sorting is not required for correct output.

  • BLEND - Support for this mode varies. There is no perfect and fast solution that works for all cases. Client implementations should try to achieve the correct blending output for as many situations as possible. Whether depth value is written or whether to sort is up to the implementation. For example, implementations may discard pixels that have zero or close to zero alpha value to avoid sorting issues.

3.9.5. Double Sided

The doubleSided property specifies whether the material is double sided.

When this value is false, back-face culling is enabled, i.e., only front-facing triangles are rendered.

When this value is true, back-face culling is disabled and double sided lighting is enabled. The back-face MUST have its normals reversed before the lighting equation is evaluated.

3.9.6. Default Material

The default material, used when a mesh does not specify a material, is defined to be a material with no properties specified. All the default values of material apply.

Implementation Note

This material does not emit light and will be black unless some lighting is present in the scene.

3.9.7. Point and Line Materials

This specification does not define size or style of non-triangular primitives (such as points or lines), and applications MAY use various techniques to render these primitives as appropriate. However, the following conventions are RECOMMENDED for consistency:

  • Points and Lines SHOULD have widths of 1px in viewport space.

  • Points or Lines with NORMAL and TANGENT attributes SHOULD be rendered with standard lighting including normal textures.

  • Points or Lines with NORMAL but without TANGENT attributes SHOULD be rendered with standard lighting but ignoring any normal textures on the material.

  • Points or Lines with no NORMAL attribute SHOULD be rendered without lighting and instead use the sum of the base color value (as defined above, multiplied by COLOR_0 when present) and the emissive value.

3.10. Cameras

3.10.1. Overview

Cameras are stored in the asset’s cameras array. Each camera defines a type property that designates the type of projection (perspective or orthographic), and either a perspective or orthographic property that defines the details. A camera is instantiated within a node using the node.camera property.

A camera object defines the projection matrix that transforms scene coordinates from the view space to the clip space.

A node containing the camera instance defines the view matrix that transforms scene coordinates from the global space to the view space.

3.10.2. View Matrix

The camera is defined such that the local +X axis is to the right, the “lens” looks towards the local -Z axis, and the top of the camera is aligned with the local +Y axis.

The view matrix is derived from the global transform of the node containing the camera with the scaling ignored. If the node’s global transform is identity, the location of the camera is at the origin.

3.10.3. Projection Matrices

3.10.3.1. Overview

The projection can be perspective or orthographic.

There are two subtypes of perspective projections: finite and infinite. When the zfar property is undefined, the camera defines an infinite projection. Otherwise, the camera defines a finite projection.

The following example defines two perspective cameras with supplied values for Y field of view, aspect ratio, and clipping information.

{
    "cameras": [
        {
            "name": "Finite perspective camera",
            "type": "perspective",
            "perspective": {
                "aspectRatio": 1.5,
                "yfov": 0.660593,
                "zfar": 100,
                "znear": 0.01
            }
        },
        {
            "name": "Infinite perspective camera",
            "type": "perspective",
            "perspective": {
                "aspectRatio": 1.5,
                "yfov": 0.660593,
                "znear": 0.01
            }
        }
    ]
}

Client implementations SHOULD use the following projection matrices.

3.10.3.2. Infinite perspective projection

Let

  • a be the aspect ratio (width over height) of the field of view, set by camera.perspective.aspectRatio, or the aspect ratio of the viewport;

  • y be the vertical field of view in radians, set by camera.perspective.yfov;

  • n be the distance to the near clipping plane, set by camera.perspective.znear.

Then, the projection matrix is defined as follows.

\[\begin{bmatrix} 1 \over { a \times \tan(0.5 \times y) } & 0 & 0 & 0 \\ 0 & 1 \over { \tan(0.5 \times y) } & 0 & 0 \\ 0 & 0 & -1 & -2n \\ 0 & 0 & -1 & 0 \end{bmatrix}\]

When the provided camera’s aspect ratio does not match the aspect ratio of the viewport, client implementations SHOULD NOT crop or perform non-uniform scaling (“stretching”) to fill the viewport.

3.10.3.3. Finite perspective projection

Let

  • a be the aspect ratio (width over height) of the field of view, set by camera.perspective.aspectRatio, or the aspect ratio of the viewport;

  • y be the vertical field of view in radians, set by camera.perspective.yfov;

  • f be the distance to the far clipping plane, set by camera.perspective.zfar;

  • n be the distance to the near clipping plane, set by camera.perspective.znear.

Then, the projection matrix is defined as follows.

\[\begin{bmatrix} 1 \over { a \times \tan(0.5 \times y) } & 0 & 0 & 0 \\ 0 & 1 \over { \tan(0.5 \times y) } & 0 & 0 \\ 0 & 0 & { f + n } \over { n - f } & { 2 f n } \over { n - f } \\ 0 & 0 & -1 & 0 \end{bmatrix}\]

When the provided camera’s aspect ratio does not match the aspect ratio of the viewport, client implementations SHOULD NOT crop or perform non-uniform scaling (“stretching”) to fill the viewport.

3.10.3.4. Orthographic projection

Let

  • r be half the orthographic width, set by camera.orthographic.xmag;

  • t be half the orthographic height, set by camera.orthographic.ymag;

  • f be the distance to the far clipping plane, set by camera.orthographic.zfar;

  • n be the distance to the near clipping plane, set by camera.orthographic.znear.

Then, the projection matrix is defined as follows.

\[\begin{bmatrix} 1 \over r & 0 & 0 & 0 \\ 0 & 1 \over t & 0 & 0 \\ 0 & 0 & 2 \over { n - f } & { f + n } \over { n - f } \\ 0 & 0 & 0 & 1 \end{bmatrix}\]

When r / t does not match the aspect ratio of the viewport, client implementations SHOULD NOT crop or perform non-uniform scaling (“stretching”) to fill the viewport.

3.11. Animations

glTF supports articulated and skinned animation via key frame animations of nodes' transforms. Key frame data is stored in buffers and referenced in animations using accessors.

glTF 2.0 also supports animation of instantiated morph targets in a similar fashion.

Note

glTF 2.0 only supports animating node transforms and morph target weights. Extensions or a future version of the specification may support animating arbitrary properties, such as material colors and texture transformation matrices.

Note

glTF 2.0 defines only storage of animation keyframes, so this specification doesn’t define any runtime behavior, such as: order of playing, auto-start, loops, mapping of timelines, etc. When loading a glTF 2.0 asset, client implementations may select an animation entry and pause it on the first frame, play it automatically, or ignore all animations until further user requests. When a playing animation is stopped, client implementations may reset the scene to the initial state or freeze it at the current frame.

Implementation Note

glTF 2.0 does not specifically define how an animation will be used when imported but, as a best practice, it is recommended that each animation is self-contained as an action. For example, “Walk” and “Run” animations might each contain multiple channels targeting a model’s various bones. The client implementation may choose when to play any of the available animations.

All animations are stored in the animations array of the asset. An animation is defined as a set of channels (the channels property) and a set of samplers that specify accessors with key frame data and interpolation method (the samplers property).

The following examples show the expected usage of animations.

{
    "animations": [
        {
            "name": "Animate all properties of one node with different samplers",
            "channels": [
                {
                    "sampler": 0,
                    "target": {
                        "node": 1,
                        "path": "rotation"
                    }
                },
                {
                    "sampler": 1,
                    "target": {
                        "node": 1,
                        "path": "scale"
                    }
                },
                {
                    "sampler": 2,
                    "target": {
                        "node": 1,
                        "path": "translation"
                    }
                }
            ],
            "samplers": [
                {
                    "input": 4,
                    "interpolation": "LINEAR",
                    "output": 5
                },
                {
                    "input": 4,
                    "interpolation": "LINEAR",
                    "output": 6
                },
                {
                    "input": 4,
                    "interpolation": "LINEAR",
                    "output": 7
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            "name": "Animate two nodes with different samplers",
            "channels": [
                {
                    "sampler": 0,
                    "target": {
                        "node": 0,
                        "path": "rotation"
                    }
                },
                {
                    "sampler": 1,
                    "target": {
                        "node": 1,
                        "path": "rotation"
                    }
                }
            ],
            "samplers": [
                {
                    "input": 0,
                    "interpolation": "LINEAR",
                    "output": 1
                },
                {
                    "input": 2,
                    "interpolation": "LINEAR",
                    "output": 3
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            "name": "Animate two nodes with the same sampler",
            "channels": [
                {
                    "sampler": 0,
                    "target": {
                        "node": 0,
                        "path": "rotation"
                    }
                },
                {
                    "sampler": 0,
                    "target": {
                        "node": 1,
                        "path": "rotation"
                    }
                }
            ],
            "samplers": [
                {
                    "input": 0,
                    "interpolation": "LINEAR",
                    "output": 1
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            "name": "Animate a node rotation channel and the weights of a Morph Target it instantiates",
            "channels": [
                {
                    "sampler": 0,
                    "target": {
                        "node": 1,
                        "path": "rotation"
                    }
                },
                {
                    "sampler": 1,
                    "target": {
                        "node": 1,
                        "path": "weights"
                    }
                }
            ],
            "samplers": [
                {
                    "input": 4,
                    "interpolation": "LINEAR",
                    "output": 5
                },
                {
                    "input": 4,
                    "interpolation": "LINEAR",
                    "output": 6
                }
            ]
        }
    ]
}

Channels connect the output values of the key frame animation to a specific node in the hierarchy. A channel’s sampler property contains the index of one of the samplers present in the containing animation’s samplers array. The target property is an object that identifies which node to animate using its node property, and which property of the node to animate using path. Non-animated properties MUST keep their values during animation.

When node isn’t defined, channel SHOULD be ignored. Valid path names are "translation", "rotation", "scale", and "weights".

Nodes that do not contain a mesh with morph targets MUST NOT be targeted with "weights" path.

Within one animation, each target (a combination of a node and a path) MUST NOT be used more than once.

Implementation Note

This prevents potential ambiguities when one target is affected by two or more overlapping samplers.

Each of the animation’s samplers defines the input/output pair: a set of floating-point scalar values representing linear time in seconds; and a set of vectors or scalars representing the animated property. All values are stored in a buffer and accessed via accessors; refer to the table below for output accessor types. Interpolation between keys is performed using the interpolation method specified in the interpolation property. Supported interpolation values include LINEAR, STEP, and CUBICSPLINE. See Appendix C for additional information about interpolation modes.

The inputs of each sampler are relative to t = 0, defined as the beginning of the parent animations entry. Before and after the provided input range, output MUST be clamped to the nearest end of the input range.

Implementation Note

For example, if the earliest sampler input for an animation is t = 10, a client implementation must begin playback of that animation channel at t = 0 with output clamped to the first available output value.

Samplers within a given animation MAY have different inputs.

channel.path Accessor Type Component Type(s) Description

"translation"

"VEC3"

float

XYZ translation vector

"rotation"

"VEC4"

float
signed byte normalized
unsigned byte normalized
signed short normalized
unsigned short normalized

XYZW rotation quaternion

"scale"

"VEC3"

float

XYZ scale vector

"weights"

"SCALAR"

float
signed byte normalized
unsigned byte normalized
signed short normalized
unsigned short normalized

Weights of morph targets

Implementations MUST use following equations to decode real floating-point value f from a normalized integer c and vise-versa:

accessor.componentType int-to-float float-to-int

signed byte

f = max(c / 127.0, -1.0)

c = round(f * 127.0)

unsigned byte

f = c / 255.0

c = round(f * 255.0)

signed short

f = max(c / 32767.0, -1.0)

c = round(f * 32767.0)

unsigned short

f = c / 65535.0

c = round(f * 65535.0)

Animation sampler’s input accessor MUST have its min and max properties defined.

Implementation Note

Animations with non-linear time inputs, such as time warps in Autodesk 3ds Max or Maya, are not directly representable with glTF animations. glTF is a runtime format and non-linear time inputs are expensive to compute at runtime. Exporter implementations should sample a non-linear time animation into linear inputs and outputs for an accurate representation.

A morph target animation frame is defined by a sequence of scalars of length equal to the number of targets in the animated morph target. These scalar sequences MUST lie end-to-end as a single stream in the output accessor, whose final size is equal to the number of morph targets times the number of animation frames.

Morph target animation is by nature sparse, consider using Sparse Accessors for storage of morph target animation. When used with CUBICSPLINE interpolation, tangents (ak, bk) and values (vk) are grouped within keyframes:

a1,a2,…​an,v1,v2,…​vn,b1,b2,…​bn

See Appendix C for additional information about interpolation modes.

Skinned animation is achieved by animating the joints in the skin’s joint hierarchy.

3.12. Specifying Extensions

glTF defines an extension mechanism that allows the base format to be extended with new capabilities. Any glTF object MAY have an optional extensions property, as in the following example:

{
    "material": [
        {
            "extensions": {
                "KHR_materials_sheen": {
                    "sheenColorFactor": [
                        1.0,
                        0.329,
                        0.1
                    ],
                    "sheenRoughnessFactor": 0.8
                }
            }
        }
    ]
}

All extensions used in a glTF asset MUST be listed in the top-level extensionsUsed array object, e.g.,

{
    "extensionsUsed": [
        "KHR_materials_sheen",
        "VENDOR_physics"
    ]
}

All glTF extensions required to load and/or render an asset MUST be listed in the top-level extensionsRequired array, e.g.,

{
    "extensionsRequired": [
        "KHR_texture_transform"
    ],
    "extensionsUsed": [
        "KHR_texture_transform"
    ]
}

extensionsRequired is a subset of extensionsUsed. All values in extensionsRequired MUST also exist in extensionsUsed.

4. GLB File Format Specification

4.1. General (Informative)

glTF provides two delivery options that can be used together:

  • glTF JSON points to external binary data (geometry, key frames, skins), and images.

  • glTF JSON embeds base64-encoded binary data, and images inline using data URIs.

Hence, loading glTF files usually requires either separate requests to fetch all binary data, or extra space due to base64-encoding. Base64-encoding requires extra processing to decode and increases the file size (by ~33% for encoded resources). While transport-layer gzip mitigates the file size increase, decompression and decoding still add significant loading time.

To avoid this file size and processing overhead, a container format, Binary glTF is introduced that enables a glTF asset, including JSON, buffers, and images, to be stored in a single binary blob.

A Binary glTF asset can still refer to external resources. For example, an application that wants to keep images as separate files may embed everything needed for a scene, except images, in a Binary glTF.

4.2. Structure

A Binary glTF (which can be a file, for example) has the following structure:

  • A 12-byte preamble, called the header.

  • One or more chunks that contain JSON content and binary data.

The chunk containing JSON MAY refer to external resources as usual, and MAY also reference resources stored within other chunks.

4.3. File Extension & Media Type

The file extension to be used with Binary glTF is .glb.

The registered media type is model/gltf-binary.

4.4. Binary glTF Layout

4.4.1. Overview

Binary glTF is little endian. The figure below shows an example of a Binary glTF asset.

glb2
Figure 8. Binary glTF Layout

The following sections describe the structure more in detail.

4.4.2. Header

The 12-byte header consists of three 4-byte entries:

uint32 magic
uint32 version
uint32 length
  • magic MUST be equal to equal 0x46546C67. It is ASCII string glTF and can be used to identify data as Binary glTF.

  • version indicates the version of the Binary glTF container format. This specification defines version 2.

    Client implementations that load GLB format MUST also check for the asset version properties in the JSON chunk, as the version specified in the GLB header only refers to the GLB container version.

  • length is the total length of the Binary glTF, including header and all chunks, in bytes.

4.4.3. Chunks

4.4.3.1. Overview

Each chunk has the following structure:

uint32 chunkLength
uint32 chunkType
ubyte[] chunkData
  • chunkLength is the length of chunkData, in bytes.

  • chunkType indicates the type of chunk. See Table 1 for details.

  • chunkData is the binary payload of the chunk.

The start and the end of each chunk MUST be aligned to a 4-byte boundary. See chunks definitions for padding schemes. Chunks MUST appear in exactly the order given in Table 1.

Table 1. Chunk types
Chunk Type ASCII Description Occurrences

1.

0x4E4F534A

JSON

Structured JSON content

1

2.

0x004E4942

BIN

Binary buffer

0 or 1

Client implementations MUST ignore chunks with unknown types to enable glTF extensions to reference additional chunks with new types following the first two chunks.

4.4.3.2. Structured JSON Content

This chunk holds the glTF JSON, as it would be provided within a .gltf file.

ECMAScript Implementation Note

In a JavaScript implementation, the TextDecoder API can be used to extract the glTF content from the ArrayBuffer, and then the JSON can be parsed with JSON.parse as usual.

This chunk MUST be the very first chunk of a Binary glTF asset. By reading this chunk first, an implementation is able to progressively retrieve resources from subsequent chunks. This way, it is also possible to read only a selected subset of resources from a Binary glTF asset.

This chunk MUST be padded with trailing Space chars (0x20) to satisfy alignment requirements.

4.4.3.3. Binary buffer

This chunk contains the binary payload for geometry, animation key frames, skins, and images. See GLB-stored Buffer for details on referencing this chunk from JSON.

This chunk MUST be the second chunk of the Binary glTF asset.

This chunk MUST be padded with trailing zeros (0x00) to satisfy alignment requirements.

When the binary buffer is empty or when it is stored by other means, this chunk SHOULD be omitted.

5. Properties Reference


5.1. Accessor

A typed view into a buffer view that contains raw binary data.

Table 2. Accessor Properties
Type Description Required

bufferView

integer

The index of the bufferView.

No

byteOffset

integer

The offset relative to the start of the buffer view in bytes.

No, default: 0

componentType

integer

The datatype of the accessor’s components.

Yes

normalized

boolean

Specifies whether integer data values are normalized before usage.

No, default: false

count

integer

The number of elements referenced by this accessor.

Yes

type

string

Specifies if the accessor’s elements are scalars, vectors, or matrices.

Yes

max

number [1-16]

Maximum value of each component in this accessor.

No

min

number [1-16]

Minimum value of each component in this accessor.

No

sparse

accessor.sparse

Sparse storage of elements that deviate from their initialization value.

No

name

string

The user-defined name of this object.

No

extensions

extension

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

No

extras

extras

Application-specific data.

No

Additional properties are allowed.

5.1.1. accessor.bufferView

The index of the buffer view. When undefined, the accessor MUST be initialized with zeros; sparse property or extensions MAY override zeros with actual values.

  • Type: integer

  • Required: No

  • Minimum: >= 0

5.1.2. accessor.byteOffset

The offset relative to the start of the buffer view in bytes. This MUST be a multiple of the size of the component datatype. This property MUST NOT be defined when bufferView is undefined.

  • Type: integer

  • Required: No, default: 0

  • Minimum: >= 0

  • Related WebGL functions: vertexAttribPointer() offset parameter

5.1.3. accessor.componentType

The datatype of the accessor’s components. UNSIGNED_INT type MUST NOT be used for any accessor that is not referenced by mesh.primitive.indices.

  • Type: integer

  • Required: Yes

  • Allowed values:

    • 5120 BYTE

    • 5121 UNSIGNED_BYTE

    • 5122 SHORT

    • 5123 UNSIGNED_SHORT

    • 5125 UNSIGNED_INT

    • 5126 FLOAT

  • Related WebGL functions: type parameter of vertexAttribPointer(). The corresponding typed arrays are Int8Array, Uint8Array, Int16Array, Uint16Array, Uint32Array, and Float32Array.

5.1.4. accessor.normalized

Specifies whether integer data values are normalized (true) to [0, 1] (for unsigned types) or to [-1, 1] (for signed types) when they are accessed. This property MUST NOT be set to true for accessors with FLOAT or UNSIGNED_INT component type.

  • Type: boolean

  • Required: No, default: false

  • Related WebGL functions: normalized parameter of vertexAttribPointer()

5.1.5. accessor.count

The number of elements referenced by this accessor, not to be confused with the number of bytes or number of components.

  • Type: integer

  • Required: Yes

  • Minimum: >= 1

5.1.6. accessor.type

Specifies if the accessor’s elements are scalars, vectors, or matrices.

  • Type: string

  • Required: Yes

  • Allowed values:

    • "SCALAR"

    • "VEC2"

    • "VEC3"

    • "VEC4"

    • "MAT2"

    • "MAT3"

    • "MAT4"

5.1.7. accessor.max

Maximum value of each component in this accessor. Array elements MUST be treated as having the same data type as accessor’s componentType. Both min and max arrays have the same length. The length is determined by the value of the type property; it can be 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, or 16.

normalized property has no effect on array values: they always correspond to the actual values stored in the buffer. When the accessor is sparse, this property MUST contain maximum values of accessor data with sparse substitution applied.

  • Type: number [1-16]

  • Required: No

5.1.8. accessor.min

Minimum value of each component in this accessor. Array elements MUST be treated as having the same data type as accessor’s componentType. Both min and max arrays have the same length. The length is determined by the value of the type property; it can be 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, or 16.

normalized property has no effect on array values: they always correspond to the actual values stored in the buffer. When the accessor is sparse, this property MUST contain minimum values of accessor data with sparse substitution applied.

  • Type: number [1-16]

  • Required: No

5.1.9. accessor.sparse

Sparse storage of elements that deviate from their initialization value.

5.1.10. accessor.name

The user-defined name of this object. This is not necessarily unique, e.g., an accessor and a buffer could have the same name, or two accessors could even have the same name.

  • Type: string

  • Required: No

5.1.11. accessor.extensions

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

  • Type: extension

  • Required: No

  • Type of each property: Extension

5.1.12. accessor.extras

Application-specific data.


5.2. Accessor Sparse

Sparse storage of accessor values that deviate from their initialization value.

Table 3. Accessor Sparse Properties
Type Description Required

count

integer

Number of deviating accessor values stored in the sparse array.

Yes

indices

accessor.sparse.indices

An object pointing to a buffer view containing the indices of deviating accessor values. The number of indices is equal to count. Indices MUST strictly increase.

Yes

values

accessor.sparse.values

An object pointing to a buffer view containing the deviating accessor values.

Yes

extensions

extension

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

No

extras

extras

Application-specific data.

No

Additional properties are allowed.

5.2.1. accessor.sparse.count

Number of deviating accessor values stored in the sparse array.

  • Type: integer

  • Required: Yes

  • Minimum: >= 1

5.2.2. accessor.sparse.indices

An object pointing to a buffer view containing the indices of deviating accessor values. The number of indices is equal to count. Indices MUST strictly increase.

5.2.3. accessor.sparse.values

An object pointing to a buffer view containing the deviating accessor values.

5.2.4. accessor.sparse.extensions

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

  • Type: extension

  • Required: No

  • Type of each property: Extension

5.2.5. accessor.sparse.extras

Application-specific data.


5.3. Accessor Sparse Indices

An object pointing to a buffer view containing the indices of deviating accessor values. The number of indices is equal to accessor.sparse.count. Indices MUST strictly increase.

Table 4. Accessor Sparse Indices Properties
Type Description Required

bufferView

integer

The index of the buffer view with sparse indices. The referenced buffer view MUST NOT have its target or byteStride properties defined. The buffer view and the optional byteOffset MUST be aligned to the componentType byte length.

Yes

byteOffset

integer

The offset relative to the start of the buffer view in bytes.

No, default: 0

componentType

integer

The indices data type.

Yes

extensions

extension

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

No

extras

extras

Application-specific data.

No

Additional properties are allowed.

5.3.1. accessor.sparse.indices.bufferView

The index of the buffer view with sparse indices. The referenced buffer view MUST NOT have its target or byteStride properties defined. The buffer view and the optional byteOffset MUST be aligned to the componentType byte length.

  • Type: integer

  • Required: Yes

  • Minimum: >= 0

5.3.2. accessor.sparse.indices.byteOffset

The offset relative to the start of the buffer view in bytes.

  • Type: integer

  • Required: No, default: 0

  • Minimum: >= 0

5.3.3. accessor.sparse.indices.componentType

The indices data type.

  • Type: integer

  • Required: Yes

  • Allowed values:

    • 5121 UNSIGNED_BYTE

    • 5123 UNSIGNED_SHORT

    • 5125 UNSIGNED_INT

5.3.4. accessor.sparse.indices.extensions

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

  • Type: extension

  • Required: No

  • Type of each property: Extension

5.3.5. accessor.sparse.indices.extras

Application-specific data.


5.4. Accessor Sparse Values

An object pointing to a buffer view containing the deviating accessor values. The number of elements is equal to accessor.sparse.count times number of components. The elements have the same component type as the base accessor. The elements are tightly packed. Data MUST be aligned following the same rules as the base accessor.

Table 5. Accessor Sparse Values Properties
Type Description Required

bufferView

integer

The index of the bufferView with sparse values. The referenced buffer view MUST NOT have its target or byteStride properties defined.

Yes

byteOffset

integer

The offset relative to the start of the bufferView in bytes.

No, default: 0

extensions

extension

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

No

extras

extras

Application-specific data.

No

Additional properties are allowed.

5.4.1. accessor.sparse.values.bufferView

The index of the bufferView with sparse values. The referenced buffer view MUST NOT have its target or byteStride properties defined.

  • Type: integer

  • Required: Yes

  • Minimum: >= 0

5.4.2. accessor.sparse.values.byteOffset

The offset relative to the start of the bufferView in bytes.

  • Type: integer

  • Required: No, default: 0

  • Minimum: >= 0

5.4.3. accessor.sparse.values.extensions

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

  • Type: extension

  • Required: No

  • Type of each property: Extension

5.4.4. accessor.sparse.values.extras

Application-specific data.


5.5. Animation

A keyframe animation.

Table 6. Animation Properties
Type Description Required

channels

animation.channel [1-*]

An array of animation channels. An animation channel combines an animation sampler with a target property being animated. Different channels of the same animation MUST NOT have the same targets.

Yes

samplers

animation.sampler [1-*]

An array of animation samplers. An animation sampler combines timestamps with a sequence of output values and defines an interpolation algorithm.

Yes

name

string

The user-defined name of this object.

No

extensions

extension

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

No

extras

extras

Application-specific data.

No

Additional properties are allowed.

5.5.1. animation.channels

An array of animation channels. An animation channel combines an animation sampler with a target property being animated. Different channels of the same animation MUST NOT have the same targets.

5.5.2. animation.samplers

An array of animation samplers. An animation sampler combines timestamps with a sequence of output values and defines an interpolation algorithm.

5.5.3. animation.name

The user-defined name of this object. This is not necessarily unique, e.g., an accessor and a buffer could have the same name, or two accessors could even have the same name.

  • Type: string

  • Required: No

5.5.4. animation.extensions

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

  • Type: extension

  • Required: No

  • Type of each property: Extension

5.5.5. animation.extras

Application-specific data.


5.6. Animation Channel

An animation channel combines an animation sampler with a target property being animated.

Table 7. Animation Channel Properties
Type Description Required

sampler

integer

The index of a sampler in this animation used to compute the value for the target.

Yes

target

animation.channel.target

The descriptor of the animated property.

Yes

extensions

extension

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

No

extras

extras

Application-specific data.

No

Additional properties are allowed.

5.6.1. animation.channel.sampler

The index of a sampler in this animation used to compute the value for the target, e.g., a node’s translation, rotation, or scale (TRS).

  • Type: integer

  • Required: Yes

  • Minimum: >= 0

5.6.2. animation.channel.target

The descriptor of the animated property.

5.6.3. animation.channel.extensions

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

  • Type: extension

  • Required: No

  • Type of each property: Extension

5.6.4. animation.channel.extras

Application-specific data.


5.7. Animation Channel Target

The descriptor of the animated property.

Table 8. Animation Channel Target Properties
Type Description Required

node

integer

The index of the node to animate. When undefined, the animated object MAY be defined by an extension.

No

path

string

The name of the node’s TRS property to animate, or the "weights" of the Morph Targets it instantiates. For the "translation" property, the values that are provided by the sampler are the translation along the X, Y, and Z axes. For the "rotation" property, the values are a quaternion in the order (x, y, z, w), where w is the scalar. For the "scale" property, the values are the scaling factors along the X, Y, and Z axes.

Yes

extensions

extension

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

No

extras

extras

Application-specific data.

No

Additional properties are allowed.

5.7.1. animation.channel.target.node

The index of the node to animate. When undefined, the animated object MAY be defined by an extension.

  • Type: integer

  • Required: No

  • Minimum: >= 0

5.7.2. animation.channel.target.path

The name of the node’s TRS property to animate, or the "weights" of the Morph Targets it instantiates. For the "translation" property, the values that are provided by the sampler are the translation along the X, Y, and Z axes. For the "rotation" property, the values are a quaternion in the order (x, y, z, w), where w is the scalar. For the "scale" property, the values are the scaling factors along the X, Y, and Z axes.

  • Type: string

  • Required: Yes

  • Allowed values:

    • "translation"

    • "rotation"

    • "scale"

    • "weights"

5.7.3. animation.channel.target.extensions

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

  • Type: extension

  • Required: No

  • Type of each property: Extension

5.7.4. animation.channel.target.extras

Application-specific data.


5.8. Animation Sampler

An animation sampler combines timestamps with a sequence of output values and defines an interpolation algorithm.

Table 9. Animation Sampler Properties
Type Description Required

input

integer

The index of an accessor containing keyframe timestamps.

Yes

interpolation

string

Interpolation algorithm.

No, default: "LINEAR"

output

integer

The index of an accessor, containing keyframe output values.

Yes

extensions

extension

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

No

extras

extras

Application-specific data.

No

Additional properties are allowed.

5.8.1. animation.sampler.input

The index of an accessor containing keyframe timestamps. The accessor MUST be of scalar type with floating-point components. The values represent time in seconds with time[0] >= 0.0, and strictly increasing values, i.e., time[n + 1] > time[n].

  • Type: integer

  • Required: Yes

  • Minimum: >= 0

5.8.2. animation.sampler.interpolation

Interpolation algorithm.

  • Type: string

  • Required: No, default: "LINEAR"

  • Allowed values:

    • "LINEAR" The animated values are linearly interpolated between keyframes. When targeting a rotation, spherical linear interpolation (slerp) SHOULD be used to interpolate quaternions. The number of output elements MUST equal the number of input elements.

    • "STEP" The animated values remain constant to the output of the first keyframe, until the next keyframe. The number of output elements MUST equal the number of input elements.

    • "CUBICSPLINE" The animation’s interpolation is computed using a cubic spline with specified tangents. The number of output elements MUST equal three times the number of input elements. For each input element, the output stores three elements, an in-tangent, a spline vertex, and an out-tangent. There MUST be at least two keyframes when using this interpolation.

5.8.3. animation.sampler.output

The index of an accessor, containing keyframe output values.

  • Type: integer

  • Required: Yes

  • Minimum: >= 0

5.8.4. animation.sampler.extensions

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

  • Type: extension

  • Required: No

  • Type of each property: Extension

5.8.5. animation.sampler.extras

Application-specific data.


5.9. Asset

Metadata about the glTF asset.

Table 10. Asset Properties
Type Description Required

copyright

string

A copyright message suitable for display to credit the content creator.

No

generator

string

Tool that generated this glTF model. Useful for debugging.

No

version

string

The glTF version in the form of <major>.<minor> that this asset targets.

Yes

minVersion

string

The minimum glTF version in the form of <major>.<minor> that this asset targets. This property MUST NOT be greater than the asset version.

No

extensions

extension

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

No

extras

extras

Application-specific data.

No

Additional properties are allowed.

A copyright message suitable for display to credit the content creator.

  • Type: string

  • Required: No

5.9.2. asset.generator

Tool that generated this glTF model. Useful for debugging.

  • Type: string

  • Required: No

5.9.3. asset.version

The glTF version in the form of <major>.<minor> that this asset targets.

  • Type: string

  • Required: Yes

  • Pattern: ^[0-9]+\.[0-9]+$

5.9.4. asset.minVersion

The minimum glTF version in the form of <major>.<minor> that this asset targets. This property MUST NOT be greater than the asset version.

  • Type: string

  • Required: No

  • Pattern: ^[0-9]+\.[0-9]+$

5.9.5. asset.extensions

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

  • Type: extension

  • Required: No

  • Type of each property: Extension

5.9.6. asset.extras

Application-specific data.


5.10. Buffer

A buffer points to binary geometry, animation, or skins.

Table 11. Buffer Properties
Type Description Required

uri

string

The URI (or IRI) of the buffer.

No

byteLength

integer

The length of the buffer in bytes.

Yes

name

string

The user-defined name of this object.

No

extensions

extension

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

No

extras

extras

Application-specific data.

No

Additional properties are allowed.

5.10.1. buffer.uri

The URI (or IRI) of the buffer. Relative paths are relative to the current glTF asset. Instead of referencing an external file, this field MAY contain a data:-URI.

  • Type: string

  • Required: No

  • Format: iri-reference

5.10.2. buffer.byteLength

The length of the buffer in bytes.

  • Type: integer

  • Required: Yes

  • Minimum: >= 1

5.10.3. buffer.name

The user-defined name of this object. This is not necessarily unique, e.g., an accessor and a buffer could have the same name, or two accessors could even have the same name.

  • Type: string

  • Required: No

5.10.4. buffer.extensions

JSON object with extension-specific objects.

  • Type: extension

  • Required: No

  • Type of each property: Extension

5.10.5. buffer.extras

Application-specific data.


5.11. Buffer View

A view into a buffer generally representing a subset of the buffer.

Table 12. Buffer View Properties
Type Description Required

buffer

integer

The index of the buffer.

Yes

byteOffset

integer