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SilverLining 5.0 SDK Simulates Storm Clouds in OpenGLSundog Software released version 5.0 of the SilverLining Sky, 3D Cloud, and Weather SDK, featuring support for OpenGL 2.0 through 4.5. SilverLining is a C++ library that simulates real-time skies for any given time, location, and weather conditions. It implements a variety of volumetric rendering techniques to represent many different 3D cloud types in a physically realistic manner from any angle, while maintaining high frame-rates. SilverLining 5 introduces new hand-modeled storm clouds suitable for use in flight simulators. Large, natural-looking cumulonimbus thunderheads and towering cumulus clouds in various stages of development are included. SilverLining integrates into any OpenGL application easily with simple calls to initialize, update, and draw its skies, clouds, and precipitation effects. Integration code for OpenSceneGraph is included. SilverLining is widely used in the training and simulation industry, and powers the popular "SkyMaxx Pro" add-on for the X-Plane flight simulator.

Pro Tip: Linking OpenGL for Server-Side RenderingVisualization is a great tool for understanding large amounts of data, but transferring the data from an HPC system or from the cloud to a local workstation for analysis can be a painful experience. Analyzing and visualizing data right where it is generated and using server-side rendering lets you deliver high quality visual content to any client hardware. Whether it’s a DGX station or a smartphone. With the arrival of EGL, taking advantage of OpenGL on a headless server has become even simpler, making it unnecessary to run an X server or any other tools. Slight modifications to your OpenGL context management code using EGL functions is required as described in this post. Using EGL also requires you to link your application to different libraries. This post from NVIDIA is about how to correctly link a modern OpenGL application.

Google has merged Earth Pro with the free Google Earth, now offering only Goole Earth Pro. Another notable change: In the past you had the option to switch between DirectX or OpenGL when running Google Earth on Windows, now the application defaults to OpenGL mode. Learn about the other improvements.

Codeplay announces SPIR-V support for ComputeCpp in v0.3.0. This beta implementation of SPIR-V for OpenCL support means that developers can use SYCL and ComputeCpp to develop for any OpenCL hardware that includes a driver that consumes SPIR-V.

A new post from GPU Open on Vulkan. "An important part of learning the Vulkan® API – just like any other API – is to understand what types of objects are defined in it, what they represent and how they relate to each other. To help with this, we’ve created a diagram that shows all of the Vulkan objects and some of their relationships, especially the order in which you create one from another."

The landscape of APIs for accelerating vision and neural network software using specialized processors continues to rapidly evolve. Many industry-standard APIs, such as OpenCL and OpenVX, are being upgraded to increasingly focus on deep learning, and the industry is rapidly adopting the new generation of low-level, explicit GPU APIs, such as Vulkan, that tightly integrate graphics and compute. Neil Trevett presented the "Vision Acceleration API Landscape: Options and Trade-offs" tutorial at the May 2017 Embedded Vision Summit.

With SIGGRAPH 2017 almost behind us, we wanted to ensure you could find everything Khronos related one place:

Why we should all support glTF 2.0 as THE standard asset exchange format for game enginesGodot Engine now supports the full glTF 2.0 specification. With the release of Godot 3.0 alpha1, users needed more content to test with the new 3D engine. Sites like Sketchfab provide plenty of PBR-ready assets for downloading, and plugins that export scenes from other popular game engines to this format. The surprise, though, is how good this format is for video game asset exchange. Nothing as good existed before, and it solves a problem that we, as an industry, have been struggling with for a long time. Khronos, with glTF 2.0, has given us a fantastic chance to standardize a smooth workflow between 3D modelling software and game engines. To better understand why, a list of previous attempts will be explained and why they failed.