Skip to main content

Vulkan tagged news

In this blog from Arm, Hans-Kristian Arntzen looks at how to implement deferred shading, a style of rendering which is still quite common. The deferred techniques have evolved over time, but the fundamental remains where a G-buffer is rendered, and lighting is computed based on that G-buffer data. This decouples geometry information from shading. Most of the innovation in the last years in the deferred space has revolved around reformulating the lighting pass, but the fundamentals remain the same.

Asynchronous compute is a trend that has proven itself to be an effective optimization technique, but it is somewhat difficult pinning down how to apply it. This idea started its life on last generation console hardware but has since been made available on modern graphics APIs like Vulkan and D3D12. It is now part of a graphics programmer’s toolbox.

In this blog, Arm highlights a new Vulkan Sample that was added to Khronos’ sample repository which demonstrates how to use async compute.

Diligent Engine is a modern, cross-platform, low-level graphics library and rendering framework that supports Vulkan, OpenGL/GLES, D3D11, D3D12, and Metal. The latest release 2.5 adds a number of major improvements:

  • Pipeline resource signatures, an abstraction over descriptor set layouts, enable applications to define explicit shader resource layouts that allow sharing shader resources between different pipeline states without the need to rebind them.
  • Multiple immediate contexts enable async compute and parallel rendering.
  • Ray queries is a powerful extension to ray tracing that allows casting rays from regular shaders (pixel, compute, etc.).
  • Wave operations enable sharing data between threads in one shader thread group.
  • Memoryless framebuffer attachments enable memory savings on mobile platforms.
  • A new tutorial demonstrates how to implement a simple hybrid renderer that combines rasterization with ray tracing.

Starting with this release, the API will be much more stable with very few breaking changes expected in the future.

In this Collabora blog post, Rohan Garg explores the new, low overhead extension in Mesa allowing OpenGL and Vulkan applications to talk to each other, bringing more flexibility to application developers while easing the transition path between the industry-standard Khronos APIs.

By Kristofer Rose - Developer Relations, The Khronos Group

It has been a while in the making but we are very excited to launch the new Vulkan website to the community. Don’t worry, Vulkan is still maintained and owned by The Khronos Group; we just felt that it had outgrown its old website now that it has been five years since the Vulkan 1.0 launch.

The original Vulkan website was designed for the launch of a cutting edge new API that would, initially, have limited official materials and community content. The old website performed that role admirably, but Vulkan has come a long way and we now have a large and increasing amount of tools, libraries, educational material, and news to showcase that a single page website cannot handle. The new website allows us to gather all these currently disparate internal and community resources in a single, easily navigable place.

Our primary goal with the new vulkan.org site was to place key resources prominently to allow developers to quickly and easily find what they need. With this in mind, each page has buttons in the banner leading straight to the most essential and popular resources. If you need the Vulkan Specification, SDK or Guide you can just jump straight there, no digging needed.

The new site has a whole page dedicated to Vulkan tools and support , giving developers access to SDKs, profilers, debuggers, libraries, language bindings, game engines and frameworks all easy to navigate to through a series of quick buttons. This is a huge improvement and it let’s developers discover new tools or quickly find their go to favorites.

Vulkan is enjoying a boom in adoption by world class developers and we want to make sure we are showcasing this exciting content to our visitors. As such you’ll notice much more prominent use of imagery across the site that will be updated as time goes on and new content is available. There is also now a dedicated “Made with Vulkan” showcase which is a living list of Vulkan content and reveals just how powerful and versatile the API is. If you have a Vulkan project that you would like to let us know about, please use the linked form on the Made with Vulkan page above the showcase.

We hope this website becomes a new focal point for the Vulkan community and improves the Vulkan development experience for both new and experienced developers.

The Khronos Group and VeriSilicon are holding a joint Technical Tutorial and Workshop in Shanghai on April 22 & 23rd. The first day will be a virtual event and will include an overview of the Khronos Group and then deep dive into Vulkan and Vulkan Ray Tracing. On day 2, which will be onsite in Shanghai, the workshop will focus on OpenXR and parallel processing, vision acceleration and inferencing. Be sure to check out the event’s page for more information and register.

Join us online at the 9th International Workshop on OpenCL, including SYCLcon 2021, for four days of talks April 26-29,2021. There will be workshops and community networking aimed at furthering the collaboration and knowledge sharing amongst the international community of high-performance computing specialist working with OpenCL, SYCL, SPIR and Vulkan Compute. The event provides a rich mix of hands-on tutorials, technical presentations, research papers, posters, panel discussions, networking and vendor discussions. It also provides a formal channel for community feedback to the Khronos Group, the industry body responsible for the standards.

Intel’s open-source “ANV” Vulkan driver now supports the Vulkan ext_conservative_rasterization extension. The conservative rasterization mode allows for over or under estimation for limiting the rasterization process and ensuring certainty over the rendering behavior. The extension is supported by Intel’s Mesa Vulkan driver in Git ahead of Mesa 21.1.