Sycl tagged news

C++ Ray-Tracing in a Weekend by Peter Shirley is a great resource to start learning about ray-tracers and how to implement one, and at the same time providing all the source code in a GitHub repository. The main goal of this blog post is not to teach the concepts of ray-tracing, Peter does a great job of that, but provide a walk-through tutorial on how to accelerate practical applications and algorithms using SYCL. Read on to learn more.

To coincide with IWOCL and SYCLcon 2020 Codeplay is releasing ComputeCpp v2.0.0 which brings with it some changes to Codeplay’s practices and support as well as adding some new features. “Unified Shared Memory (USM)” aims to reduce the barrier to integrate SYCL code into existing C++ codebases by introducing new modes that reduce the amount of code that must be changed to interface the two codes. An “experimental” version of USM in ComputeCpp available in v2.0.0.

Today, The Khronos® Group, an open consortium of industry-leading companies creating advanced interoperability standards, publicly releases the OpenCL™ 3.0 Provisional Specifications. OpenCL 3.0 realigns the OpenCL roadmap to enable developer-requested functionality to be broadly deployed by hardware vendors, and it significantly increases deployment flexibility by empowering conformant OpenCL implementations to focus on functionality relevant to their target markets. OpenCL 3.0 also integrates subgroup functionality into the core specification, ships with a new OpenCL C 3.0 language specification, uses a new unified specification format, and introduces extensions for asynchronous data copies to enable a new class of embedded processors. The provisional OpenCL 3.0 specifications enable the developer community to provide feedback on GitHub before the specifications and conformance tests are finalized.

The 8th International Workshop on OpenCL, SYCL, Vulkan and SPIR-V starts today, April 27th 2020, and will be a digital only event. The complete conference program is online showing first up SYCL Tutorials with ‘An Introduction to SYCL’ presented by Codeplay, Heidelberg University, Intel and Xilinx. Registration is free. Listen now to Michael Wong, SYCL Working Group Chair give a SYCL State of the Union, with slides and video.

Codeplay has made significant contributions to enabling an open standard, cross-architecture interface for developers as part of the oneAPI industry initiative. Contributions outlined in this blog post, harnesses the cuBLAS library for NVIDIA GPUs and the open standard SYCL and DPC++ implementation as well as including performance improvements. This implementation uses oneAPI Math Kernel Library (oneMKL) APIs along with the cuBLAS library, which is optimized to bring native performance to developers using NVIDIA GPUs.

Codeplay are attending ECHEP with workshop on SYCL

Peter Žužek, Senior Software Engineer SYCL, will be presenting at the Efficient Computing for High Energy Physics workshop on the 17th and 18th February at the Higgs Centre for Theoretical Physics at the University of Edinburgh. His talk will cover an introduction to SYCL and the range of frameworks available to SYCL developers. As a model, SYCL enables physicists to write highly performant software that can be run on a broad range of HPC architectures. The workshop will run from 9am on 17th February until 5pm on 18th February. The workshop is funded by STFC’s opportunities call and by the Higgs Centre for Theoretical Physics in Edinburgh.

ComputeCpp, the Codeplay implementation of SYCL, offers experimental support for NVIDIA GPUs using OpenCL. NVIDIA’s PTX, DPC++ (Intel’s SYCL implementation) offers the opportunity to add full support for NVIDIA GPUs integrated into the LLVM compiler without going through OpenCL. Codeplay has open sourced the experimental phase of their implementation that enables SYCL developers to target NVIDIA GPUs.

The Khronos SYCL standard as a single-source C++-based programming model for OpenCL. SYCL is one of the elements for Intel’s GPU compute plans with the forthcoming Xe graphics cards and fits into their oneAPI umbrella. Intel just released their SYCL Compiler and Runtimes 2019-12 release with numerous updates. Learn more about this release on Phoronix or visit the Intel LLVM GitHub releases.

The aim of this guide from Codeplay Software is to summarize and analyze the different techniques for deciding what work group size to use for optimal performance, and explain what needs to be considered when choosing an ideal work group size value. The techniques covered in the guide are a summary of the most common ones used across the GPGPU industry, not just for SYCL.

ComputeCpp v1.1.6: Changes to Work-item Mapping Optimization

In ComputeCpp v1.1.6–Codeplay’s implementation of the open standard SYCL–Codeplay introduces an optimization to the way SYCL work-items map to OpenCL processing elements in order to improve performance in the most common use cases. This blog post will start by providing an overview of what has changed and if and how you may need to update your SYCL code.

Codeplay announces Acoran, with SYCL, OpenCL and Vulkan at the core of the platform

Codeplay Software announces Acoran, the standards based platform for AI programmers. Acoran is compatible with Khronos compute standards and Intel’s oneAPI platform, enabling AI processor solutions to align with application developers by taking advantage of established standards and libraries. Codeplay has developed the Acoran platform based on the most relevant and preferred standards, with a comprehensive set of libraries that give AI developers an assured feature set for their applications. With strong momentum in Khronos standards in the industry, SYCL, OpenCL and Vulkan are at the core of the platform, with further support that includes these open source projects.

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