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oneAPI’s open, unified, cross-architecture programming model lets users run a single software abstraction on heterogeneous hardware platforms that contain CPUs, GPUs, and other accelerators across multiple vendors. Central to oneAPI is the Data Parallel C++ (DPC++) project that brings Khronos SYCL to LLVM to support data parallelism and heterogeneous programming within a single source code application. SYCL is a royalty-free, cross-platform abstraction layer built entirely on top of ISO C++, which eliminates concerns about applications being locked in to proprietary systems and software.

The Khronos Group and VeriSilicon are holding a joint Technical Tutorial and Workshop in Shanghai on April 22 & 23rd. The first day will be a virtual event and will include an overview of the Khronos Group and then deep dive into Vulkan and Vulkan Ray Tracing. On day 2, which will be onsite in Shanghai, the workshop will focus on OpenXR and parallel processing, vision acceleration and inferencing. Be sure to check out the event’s page for more information and register.

Join us online at the 9th International Workshop on OpenCL, including SYCLcon 2021, for four days of talks April 26-29,2021. There will be workshops and community networking aimed at furthering the collaboration and knowledge sharing amongst the international community of high-performance computing specialist working with OpenCL, SYCL, SPIR and Vulkan Compute. The event provides a rich mix of hands-on tutorials, technical presentations, research papers, posters, panel discussions, networking and vendor discussions. It also provides a formal channel for community feedback to the Khronos Group, the industry body responsible for the standards.

The collaboration between The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) at Argonne National Laboratory and Codeplay Software seeks to enhance the LLVM SYCL GPU compiler capabilities for NVIDIA A100 GPUs. The collaboration will help NERSC and ALCF users produce portable, high-performance applications.

Intel has teamed up with Codeplay, HPE, and other institutions from industry and academia to form a “cross-industry, open, standards-based unified programming model that delivers a common developer experience across accelerator architectures”: oneAPI. This SYCL-based programming model is expected to become the primary vehicle for applications to leverage the computing power of Intel GPUs.

The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) are working with Codeplay Software to enhance the LLVM SYCL GPU compiler capabilities for NVIDIA A100 GPUs. The collaboration is designed to help NERSC and ALCF users, along with the HPC community in general, to produce high-performance applications that are portable across compute architectures from multiple vendors.

In this blog from University of Bristol, Tom Deakin, takes a look at the new features of SYCL 2020 and how they are being used in BabelStream. You can see the transformation at the GitHub Pull Request.

Updating BabelStream from SYCL 1.2.1 to SYCL 2020 resulted in fewer lines of code and 22% fewer characters thanks to some simplifications brought into the latest version of SYCL.

Khronos announces the ratification and public release of the SYCL 2020 final specification—the open standard for single source C++ parallel programming. A major milestone encompassing years of specification development, SYCL 2020 builds on the functionality of SYCL 1.2.1 to provide improved programmability, smaller code size and increased performance. Based on C++17, SYCL 2020 enables easier acceleration of standard C++ applications and drives a closer alignment with the ISO C++ roadmap. For more details, read the press release.

The Khronos Group announces the ratification and public release of the SYCL 2020 final specification—the open standard for single source C++ parallel programming. A major milestone encompassing years of specification development, SYCL 2020 builds on the functionality of SYCL 1.2.1 to provide improved programmability, smaller code size and increased performance. Based on C++17, SYCL 2020 enables easier acceleration of standard C++ applications and drives a closer alignment with the ISO C++ roadmap.

The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), in collaboration with Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) at Argonne National Laboratory, has signed a contract with Codeplay Software to enhance the LLVM SYCL GPU compiler capabilities for NVIDIA A100 GPUs. Argeonn National Laboratory, Codeplay and NVIDIA are Khronos members.

IWOCL & SYCLcon is the premier workshop of leading academic and industrial experts to present, discuss and learn about applying OpenCL and SYCL addressing issues faced in High Performance Computing across a wide range of application domains. This is an excellent opportunity to contribute and participate in this workshop through a paper, talk, special session / tutorial, or poster. This workshop will include invited presentations from academia and industry, and a panel discussion of leading experts in the field.

Deadline for submissions is January 15th, so don’t delay. Submit your proposed content today.

Codeplay recognized that there are few resources for safety practitioners and programmers looking at developing applications with SYCL that are required to meet functional safety requirements. This three part series of blog posts will give readers an overview of what they need to know about using SYCL in a safety-critical environment. The information is most relevant to safety practitioners working with SYCL, but equally will help to educate developers working on low-level drivers for DSPs and other processors.

Codeplay Software Ltd, pioneers in enabling acceleration technologies, announced today that software developers working on HPC and AI for embedded systems will be able to take advantage of industry defined open standards from The Khronos Group on RISC-V architectures, thanks to Japan’s New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organisation (“NEDO”) project in which NSITEXE and Kyoto Microcomputer Co., Ltd. (“KMC”) are participating.

NSITEXE and KMC have ordered an implementation of LLVM for RISC-V Vector Extension Processor (“RVV”), and also Codeplay’s ComputeAorta™ and ComputeCpp™, efficient and high performance implementations of OpenCL and SYCL open standards. In the NEDO project, as a research, NSITEXE develops OpenCL and SYCL compilers from LLVM to utilize RVV, and KMC implements vector syntax to utilize RVV efficiently based on LLVM and Clang. These research developments will contribute to RISC-V community to support open-standard technologies.