Opengles tagged news

Jetson TX1 is the first embedded computer designed to process deep neural networks. With 1 teraflops of performance, Jetson delivers exceptional performance for machine learning, computer vision, GPU computing and graphics, while drawing very little power. Jetson TX1 includes a comprehensive SDK for embedded visual computing, including VisionWorks, an implementation of the OpenVX 1.0.1 specification with additional NVIDIA extensions as well as support for the latest graphics drivers and APIs, including OpenGL 4.5, OpenGL ES 3.1 and Vulkan.

Imagination Technologies webinar series part II on Vulkan is now online. Vulkan is designed from the ground up with the idea of not being bottlenecked by the CPU, and provides huge efficiency gains over previous generation graphics APIs in this area. This webinar provides an overview of what mechanisms in Vulkan enable this, what this means in practice, and why it is so important for embedded and mobile devices. The episode was presented by Tobias Hector, Software Design Engineer for Vulkan and OpenGL ES, Imagination Technologies. Be sure to add November 19th to your calendar as the webinar series continues with ‘Scaling to multiple threads’.

The Brenwill Workshop Ltd. announced that they have added support for OS X to their MetalGL product, which seamlessly brings the performance of Metal to OpenGL ES games and applications on iOS, and now OS X. MetalGL is an implementation of the OpenGL ES 2.0 API that runs on Apple’s Metal graphics framework on compatible iOS and OS X devices. MetalGL unleashes the power of Metal’s low-latency rendering to let OpenGL ES games and applications perform up to 3x the number of draw calls, and benefit from the advanced tools available for the Metal development ecosystem, all without changing the way the game or app use OpenGL ES.

ARM announced a new GPU from the same family as Mali-400 that uses only half as much power. The new GPU, the Mali-470, is targeted at next-generation wearables and IoT devices that need low-cost and low-power chips. The new Mali-470 comes with support for the ubiquitous OpenGL ES 2.0 graphics API. According to ARM, it brings a strong balance between pixel control and energy efficiency, which makes it well-suited for user interfaces. Users aren’t likely to play 3D games on their smartwatches any time soon, so OpenGL ES 3.0 and beyond shouldn’t be necessary. (By the time it is, the more efficient Vulkan should be the de facto graphics API.)

The open source C++ creative coding toolkit Cinder has recently released version 0.9. This release adds support for OpenGL ES 2 and ES 3, in addition to the latest desktop versions of OpenGL. Cinder supports targeting Windows, OS X, iOS and WinRT, with Linux and Android support under active development. In addition, this release adds support for Google’s ANGLE project, allowing deployment of OpenGL ES 3 applications on Windows and WinRT through a DirectX emulation layer. Cinder is released under the BSD License and is used by professionals in the creative and technology industries for everything from interactive installations to user interface prototyping to live concert visuals.

Qualcomm Incorporated announced two new Qualcomm Snapdragon processors. The new chipsets, the Snapdragon 430 and the Snapdragon 617, offer advances in both multimedia and connectivity for mid-range mobile devices. The Snapdragon 430 uses the powerful new Qualcomm Adreno 505 GPU with support for Open GL ES 3.1 and OpenCL 2.0.

After having gone through a management buyout just three months ago, the newly formed Basemark has introduced a suite of mobile benchmarks for iOS, OpenGL ES 3.1, and Metal. That’s impressive in of and by itself, but even more so because now for the first time a comparative test suite can be run across OSs with the same workloads and profile.

Get Hands-on with Mobile Graphics! “An Introduction to Mobile Graphics” are one day workshops offered by Imagination Technologies in North London. At Universities, graphics technologies are generally taught as part of game development or the computer science curriculum, and are based on standard console or PC graphics. Since mobile devices are becoming increasingly popular, it is important that developers also understand the specific constraints of mobile devices where power-efficient rendering is a must. Imagination is partnering with Darren McKie (games and graphics programme leader at the University of Hull) to organize a workshop designed to introduce real-time rendering using OpenGL ES on mobile devices to students who have little or no prior experience with 3D graphics programming.

This is a tool to generate OpenGL function loaders. Select the language, OpenGL / OpenGL ES versions, core or compat profiles, and hit generate. The tool generates a header file with the declarations for the GL functions and enums for the chosen GL version, and generates a little C source file that resolves all of the functions at runtime. Many thanks to Mark Sunet on LinkedIn for pointing us to this project.

In order to address some of the sources of CPU overhead and provide developers with more explicit control over rendering, we’ve been working to bring a new 3D rendering API, Vulkan™, to Android. Like OpenGL™ ES, Vulkan is an open standard for 3D graphics and rendering maintained by Khronos. We’ll be working hard to help create, test, and ship Vulkan, but at the same time, we’re also going to contribute to and support OpenGL ES. As a developer, you’ll be able to choose which API is right for you: the simplicity of OpenGL ES, or the explicit control of Vulkan. We’re committed to providing an excellent developer experience, no matter which API you choose. Vulkan is still under development, but you’ll be able to find specifications, tests, and tools once they are released online.

Khronos Group BOF Schedule and related events now online

The Khronos Group SIGGRAPH schedule has been posted online. This year Khronos brings four BOFs to the BOF Blitz, a Chapter meetup and a course a party! Khronos is celebrating it’s 15th Anniversary this year, and what a year it’s turning out to be. BOFs include OpenVX & OpenCL, OpenCL, SYCL & SPIR-V, WebGL and glTF and Vulkan, OpenGL, OpenGL ES.

Renesas Electronics Corporation introduced the ADAS Starter Kit based on Renesas’ high-end R-Car H2 System on Chip (SoC) and developed to help simplify and speed the development of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) applications. The new ADAS Starter Kit is capable of delivering more than 25,000 DMIPS and provides state-of-the-art 3D graphics capabilities and powerful vision processing cores. The R-Car H2 is powered by the ARM Cortex A-15 quad-core configuration running an additional ARM Cortex A-7 quad-core. It also features the Imagination Technologies PowerVR Series6 G6400 GPU which supports both OpenGL ES 2.0 and OpenGL ES 3.0.

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