Opencl tagged news

Khronos Group Releases OpenCL 3.0 Provisional Specifications

The Khronos Group publicly releases the OpenCL 3.0 Provisional Specifications. OpenCL 3.0 realigns the OpenCL roadmap to enable developer-requested functionality to be broadly deployed by hardware vendors, and it significantly increases deployment flexibility by empowering conformant OpenCL implementations to focus on functionality relevant to their target markets. OpenCL 3.0 also integrates subgroup functionality into the core specification, ships with a new OpenCL C 3.0 language specification, uses a new unified specification format, and introduces extensions for asynchronous data copies to enable a new class of embedded processors. The provisional OpenCL 3.0 specifications enable the developer community to provide feedback on GitHub before the specifications and conformance tests are finalized.

Today, The Khronos® Group, an open consortium of industry-leading companies creating advanced interoperability standards, publicly releases the OpenCL™ 3.0 Provisional Specifications. OpenCL 3.0 realigns the OpenCL roadmap to enable developer-requested functionality to be broadly deployed by hardware vendors, and it significantly increases deployment flexibility by empowering conformant OpenCL implementations to focus on functionality relevant to their target markets. OpenCL 3.0 also integrates subgroup functionality into the core specification, ships with a new OpenCL C 3.0 language specification, uses a new unified specification format, and introduces extensions for asynchronous data copies to enable a new class of embedded processors. The provisional OpenCL 3.0 specifications enable the developer community to provide feedback on GitHub before the specifications and conformance tests are finalized.

The 8th International Workshop on OpenCL, SYCL, Vulkan and SPIR-V starts today, April 27th 2020, and will be a digital only event. The complete conference program is online showing first up SYCL Tutorials with ‘An Introduction to SYCL’ presented by Codeplay, Heidelberg University, Intel and Xilinx. Registration is free. Listen now to Michael Wong, SYCL Working Group Chair give a SYCL State of the Union, with slides and video.

The Folding@Home non-profit organization has created the world’s fastest supercomputer from volunteers loaning spare time on their home PCs to fold proteins, a task that could prove instrumental in the fight against the coronavirus. Scientists are using this enormous amount of compute power to simulate viral proteins in an effort to reveal new coronavirus therapeutic treatments.

Folding@Home uses the Khronos OpenCL™ open standard for parallel programming to offload computations onto the GPUs contained in the networked home PCs that are often used for gaming – significantly boosting available compute power.

According to Folding@Home, the combined power of its network broke 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 operations per second – or one “exaflop” – on 25 March, making it the world’s fastest supercomputer. In fact, it is six times more powerful than the current world’s fastest traditional supercomputer, the IBM Summit, which is used for scientific research at the US’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By April 13, it had more than doubled that, hitting a new record of 2.4 exaflops, faster than the top 500 traditional supercomputers combined, thanks to almost 1 million new members of the network (Source: The Guardian).

See more on the project on the Folding@Home Blog. If you’re interested in helping, find out how on the Folding@Home Forum.

PoCL is a portable open source (MIT-licensed) implementation of the OpenCL standard (1.2 with some 2.0 features supported). In addition to being an
easily portable multi-device open-source OpenCL implementation, a major goal of this project is improving interoperability of diversity of
OpenCL-capable devices by integrating them to a single centrally orchestrated platform. Upstream PoCL currently supports various CPUs, NVIDIA GPUs via libcuda, HSA-supported GPUs and TCE ASIPs (experimental, see: http://openasip.org) It also is known to have multiple (private) ports. 1.5 release adds support for Clang/LLVM 10.0, easy to use kernel profiling features and plenty of fixes and performance improvements.

OpenCL and CUDA programming training in Amsterdam

This year StreamHPC is opening their Amsterdam offices again to train future GPU-developers. Four days of training from Monday 23 to Thursday 26 March 2020 you’re invited to train in the architecture and writing of efficient GPU software using OpenCL and CUDA. The concepts learned can be applied to other GPU-languages. More dates will be posted soon.

Cornell’s Vortex: OpenCL Compatible RISC-V GPGPU

OpenCL is currently the most widely adopted programming framework for heterogeneous platforms available on mainstream CPUs, GPUs, as well as FPGAs and custom DSP. In this work, we present Vortex, a RISC-V General-Purpose GPU that supports OpenCL 1.2.

GPUOpen has announced the release of Radeon GPU Profiler (RGP) v1.7. This release adds support for the latest Radeon graphics cards: the RX 5500 series and the RX 5300 series. RGP generates easy to understand visualizations of how your DirectX12, Vulkan, and OpenCL applications interact with the GPU at the hardware level. Profiling a game is both a quick and simple process using the Radeon Developer Panel and our public GPU driver.

Radeon ProRender enables physically-based GPU rendering through OpenCL. Now with our Full Spectrum Rendering modes, it also brings Vulkan-based ray tracing to Windows and Linux users. This allows the user to set the quality level to a wide spectrum from rasterized to fully path-traced (in OpenCL) render quality, enabling everything from fast viewport previews to accurate final renders.

ComputeCpp v1.1.6: Changes to Work-item Mapping Optimization

In ComputeCpp v1.1.6–Codeplay’s implementation of the open standard SYCL–Codeplay introduces an optimization to the way SYCL work-items map to OpenCL processing elements in order to improve performance in the most common use cases. This blog post will start by providing an overview of what has changed and if and how you may need to update your SYCL code.

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