Opencl tagged news

GPUOpen has announced the release of Radeon GPU Profiler (RGP) v1.7. This release adds support for the latest Radeon graphics cards: the RX 5500 series and the RX 5300 series. RGP generates easy to understand visualizations of how your DirectX12, Vulkan, and OpenCL applications interact with the GPU at the hardware level. Profiling a game is both a quick and simple process using the Radeon Developer Panel and our public GPU driver.

Radeon ProRender enables physically-based GPU rendering through OpenCL. Now with our Full Spectrum Rendering modes, it also brings Vulkan-based ray tracing to Windows and Linux users. This allows the user to set the quality level to a wide spectrum from rasterized to fully path-traced (in OpenCL) render quality, enabling everything from fast viewport previews to accurate final renders.

ComputeCpp v1.1.6: Changes to Work-item Mapping Optimization

In ComputeCpp v1.1.6–Codeplay’s implementation of the open standard SYCL–Codeplay introduces an optimization to the way SYCL work-items map to OpenCL processing elements in order to improve performance in the most common use cases. This blog post will start by providing an overview of what has changed and if and how you may need to update your SYCL code.

Codeplay announces Acoran, with SYCL, OpenCL and Vulkan at the core of the platform

Codeplay Software announces Acoran, the standards based platform for AI programmers. Acoran is compatible with Khronos compute standards and Intel’s oneAPI platform, enabling AI processor solutions to align with application developers by taking advantage of established standards and libraries. Codeplay has developed the Acoran platform based on the most relevant and preferred standards, with a comprehensive set of libraries that give AI developers an assured feature set for their applications. With strong momentum in Khronos standards in the industry, SYCL, OpenCL and Vulkan are at the core of the platform, with further support that includes these open source projects.

SYCL Takes Center Stage at SC19

SuperComputing (SC19) is the largest gathering of high performance computing experts in the world and it kicks off this weekend, Sunday, November 17 in Denver, CO. To kick off the conference, the Fifth International Workshop on Heterogeneous High-Performance Reconfigurable Computing (H2RC 2019) will host two presentations on Sunday solely-focused on SYCL, the Khronos open standard language for C++ single-source heterogeneous programming for OpenCL. The keynote delivered by Ronan Keryell from Khronos member, Xilinx and will outline the benefits of using SYCL for FPGA programming in a talk entitled “SYCL: A Single-Source C++ Standard for Heterogeneous Computing.” Later in the morning at 11:00am Michael Kinsner and John Freeman from Intel will present “Data Flow Pipes: A SYCL Extension for Spatial Architectures,” describing the pipes extension that enables a more usable and flexible interface.

TensorFlow gets native support for PowerVR GPUs via optimised open-source SYCL libraries

Imagination Technologies announces that developers working with TensorFlow will be able to target PowerVR GPUs directly thanks to newly optimised open source SYCL neural network libraries. The SYCL version of TensorFlow supports a very large number of AI operations and is easily user-customizable, meaning that developers using the latest neural networks, or researching their own AI technologies, can run those networks out-of-the-box with high performance on PowerVR. Because TensorFlow SYCL support is both open source and open standards-based, it’s an ideal solution for developers who want to accelerate the latest AI technologies on low-power devices. SYCL builds on the concepts and efficiency of Khronos OpenCL. The PowerVR-optimised SYCL libraries – SYCL-DNN, SYCL-BLAS and Eigen – will be available on GitHub. A TensorFlow fork containing extended SYCL support is available from Codeplay’s GitHub.

OpenCL Working Group Releases OpenCL C Language Extensions and C++ for OpenCL Programming Language Documentation

The OpenCL Working Group updated the OpenCL-Docs repository today to add two documents describing community-driven OpenCL initiatives: An initial draft of the C++ for OpenCL programming language documentation (PDF), and OpenCL C Language Extensions documentation (PDF), which includes the first language extension for variadic macros. Both documents are released under a CC-BY license. Many more resources for OpenCL are available on the OpenCL Resources page. The OpenCL community is welcome to contribute by adding and updating OpenCL resources via GitHub.

The 8th International Workshop on OpenCL (IWOCL) including SYCLcon 2020 has been announced. Join like minded developers for three days of talks, workshops and community networking aimed at furthering the collaboration and knowledge sharing amongst the international community of high-performance computing specialist working with OpenCL, SYCL, SPIR and Vulkan Compute. The event will include a mix of hands-on tutorials, technical presentations, research papers, posters, panel discussions, networking and vendor discussions.

Wind River announces new release of VxWorks. This new release offers a real-time operating system to support C++17, Boost, Python, and Rust collection of technologies, along with continued support for languages like Ada and SPARK; New LLVM-based infrastructure that enables support for a broad set of modern and productive tools and frameworks; New open source board support packages (BSPs) such as Raspberry Pi and TI Sitara AM65x for quick prototyping and flexibility of choice and OpenSSL 1.1.1 for the most up-to-date cryptography libraries. According to Charles Macfarlane of Codeplay Software, this release of VxWorks will enable developers of next generation ADAS systems to integrate the most advanced vision and machine learning solutions using OpenCL and SYCL.

LLVM/Clang release 9.0 with experimental support of C++ for OpenCL

​LLVM Clang 9.0 has been released and is now available for download. This is the first release to contain experimental support of C++ for OpenCL language mode in Clang. More details can be found in the Clang documentation. This new support will be discussed at the LLVM Developers meeting (October 2019) at the From C++ for OpenCL to C++ for accelerator devices talk by Khronos Member Anastasia Stulova.

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