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Gltf tagged news

Today the Khronos® Group announced that its glTF™ 2.0 specification for the efficient transmission and loading of 3D models has been released as the ISO/IEC 12113:2022 International Standard. Khronos has successfully completed the transposition of glTF 2.0 through the ISO/IEC JTC 1 PAS (Publicly Available Specification) Submission Process to solidify glTF’s global recognition and accelerate its adoption by industry and other standards. Khronos will continue to evolve glTF as a Khronos specification and regularly update ISO/IEC 12113 with proven, widely available glTF functionality to avoid industry fragmentation. The ISO/IEC 12113:2022 specification is available here.

In this document, the challenges by creating a “naive” glTF renderer with WebGPU is demonstrated. Then we’ll progressively refine it to make better use of the API and add more features until we’ve arrived at a renderer that makes much better, more efficient use of WebGPU’s design.

Khronos’ glTF is the first 3D model format to specify physically-based rendering (PBR), meaning it contains material properties that define in real-world units how light should be reflected & refracted in terms of physics. This means renderers are free to innovate in GPU shaders to create more and more accurate approximations of the underlying physics, because glTF does not specify any single approximation. This also means that while different renderers may make different tradeoffs of accuracy vs. speed you can have confidence that your glTF will look consistent (though not pixel-identical) even across unrelated codebases. We call glTF the JPEG of 3D because it is compressed for efficient web delivery and can be rendered consistently by a large number viewers.

Global design and BIM software provider Vectorworks, Inc. has released its third service pack for the Vectorworks 2022 product line focused on improvements to Vectorworks Cloud Services for all design customers. Other highlights include new storage integrations with Vectorworks Cloud, updates to Datasmith file exchange for a direct link to Twinmotion and support for .glTF within the MVR export from Vectorworks Spotlight.

I3S enables the streaming and storage of arbitrarily large amounts of 3D geographic data. I3S is web and cloud friendly and is rooted in modern standards and technological advancements in the areas of 3D graphics, data structuring, and mesh and texture compression. Version 1.2 of I3S includes support for supercompression of texture data using Basis Universal Texture supercompression in the Khronos KTX 2.0 texture container format, and advanced physically based materials that are feature compatible with the Khronos glTF 3D asset format standard.

Cesium announced that the 3D Tiles Next open specification is now available. The core of 3D Tiles Next is streaming interactive 3D at scale with a set of extensions to allow the developer community to better:

  • Stream semantic metadata efficiently
  • Run massive simulations and analytics via spatial indexes
  • Integrate with glTF and extension ecosystem

During this tutorial held at ISMAR 2021, four world-renowned leaders in standards development with a focus on Augmented Reality, presented on open standards for AR interoperability. Proceedings from the session are now available including presentations and video. A website for the ISMAR21 tutorial organized by Christine Perey with the support of Khronos Group, ETSI and NIST on the topic of Interoperability and Standards for AR is now live.

Interoperability specifications, such as Khronos open standards, can significantly widen their market recognition and adoption by becoming International Standards. International Standards are recognized throughout the world, and in many countries form the regulatory basis for public procurement of IT goods and services. An International Standard also provides important assurances of stability and longevity.

Khronos was approved as a ISO/IEC JTC 1 PAS Submitter In May 2021. The first specification that Khronos will submit for transposition to an International Standard is glTF 2.0. As a step in this process, Khronos has today released a new canonical glTF 2.0.0 specification. If the transposition ballot at JTC 1 succeeds, glTF 2.0.0 will become a JTC 1 International Standard some time in 2022.

In a recent Khronos blog on consumer-accessible LiDAR, Sandy Ressler of NIST wrote, “The capture of 3D objects…will be yet another technique to supplement our existing toolbox of memory recorders.” In an article published the same week, the New York Times agreed, writing “Constructing 3D models with photogrammetry allows journalists to share objects and environments with their audiences in a comprehensive, immersive way that can’t be achieved with photography or videography alone.”

The Times has released a set of guides to the capture, processing, and web delivery of 3D scenes, developed by their R&D department using a variety of tools, many in open source. They also leverage Khronos standards such as glTF with BasisU and Draco compression for publishing interactive 3D models on the Web. The products and technologies of many Khronos partners and members are also used, including Cesium’s 3D Tiles, an OGC standard based on glTF to stream large 3D models. Explore these guides to capturing images for photogrammetry using mobile devices, processing and aligning 3D scenes, and web delivery here.

Khronos looks forward to continuing to enable the evolution of reality capture and delivery, including the use of new generation sensors such as LiDAR to make the process ever more accessible.