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WebGL appears in Mozilla trunk

Michael Smith posted on his twitter page this morning that WebGL has appeared in the Mozilla trunk. It was just three days ago that WebGL was first noticed in WebKit. From the homepage of Michael Smith, "I joined the W3C in 2007 as part [of] the W3C Mobile Web Initiative. I am involved with the work on The HTML Markup Language and on standards related to browsing technologies; in particular, the phenomenon known as HTML5, as well as other standards related to Web Applications."
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Khronos Group prepares for GDC 2010

The Khronos Group is preparing for the Game Developers Conference 2010. On the Official Khronos GDC Event page, a few of the sessions and speakers have been listed, as well as information regarding the Khronos Group's booth. Session this year will cover OpenCL, OpenGL, OpenGL ES, WebGL and COLLADA. This year there will be two additional sessions, "The Best of Both Worlds: Using UIKit with OpenGL" by Noel Llopis from Snappy Touch, and "An Overview to Creating Games with Palm's Plug-in Development Kit" by Jeff Bush, Director webOS, Graphics & Gaming at Palm.
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GWT Quake II port brings Quake II to the browser via WebGL

The GWT Quake II port project uses WebGL, the Canvas API, HTML 5

Interview with Arun Ranganathan from Mozilla on Firefox and WebGL

One of Mozilla's Principal Engineers, Vladimir Vukicevic originally wrote the Canvas3D extension, which was a precursor to the WebGL work. Fairly wide support for the HTML5 Canvas element by modern browsers, along with increasing support for OpenGL ES by various hardware drivers, lead us to conclude that the time was right for a 3D drawing context within the HTML5 Canvas element.
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Mobile Is The Web–The Web Is Mobile

While sitting on the "apps everwhere" panel at MobileBeat, Neil Trevett, vice president of mobile content development at Nvidia and president of the Khronos Group coined "Mobile is the web, the web is mobile" when announcing that PCs will soon seem very archaic. Mobile computing is the future.“Apps Everywhere” panel at MobileBeat.
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Blender to WebGL exporter

Blender users rejoice. There is now an exporter for Blender so you can export your objects into WebGL javascript.
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Opera brings the WebGL experience to Windows

Opera just announced that its latest Opera 11 beta has WebGL support for Windows. Currently only Windows is support, but a promise of WebGL on Opera for other platforms has been made. As well, Opera claims they are working on WebGL for Windows using DirectX. This should be interesting, as WebGL is built on top of OpenGL. Opera 11 for Windows is available for download today.
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Khronos Releases WebGL 1.0 Specification to Bring Accelerated 3D Graphics to the Web without Plugins

The Khronos™ Group today released the final WebGL™ 1.0 specification to enable hardware-accelerated 3D graphics in HTML5 Web browsers without the need for plug-ins. WebGL defines a JavaScript binding to OpenGL® ES 2.0 to allow rich 3D graphics within a browser on any platform supporting the industry-standard OpenGL or OpenGL ES graphics APIs. WebGL has the support of major silicon and browser vendors including Apple, Google, Mozilla and Opera with multiple browsers already shipping with WebGL implementations including the beta releases for Mozilla Firefox 4.0, all channels of Google Chrome 9.0, an Opera preview build, and Apple Mac OS Safari nightly builds.


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Nokia Research releases WebCL prototype

The WebCL extension provides OpenCL bindings for JavaScript, allowing web developers to tap into the massively parallel computational resources of modern GPUs and multicore CPUs. The extension is currently available for Firefox 4 on Windows and Linux. Further development will take place in open source, and in cooperation with the Khronos WebCL working group.
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WebGL Security

WebGL pays strong attention to security - just as any web technology should. With growing recognition of WebGL in the press, we thought we would summarize Khronos' work and stance on this important topic.

  1. Khronos agrees that security is a vitally important consideration for any web standard. WebGL was architected with security in mind from the ground up.
  2. All WebGL implementations already necessarily contain safeguards which prevent out-of-range memory accesses during rendering operations and access of uninitialized memory; please see here and here. These safeguards are tested by the WebGL conformance suite.
  3. Defense against denial of service attacks is still evolving in WebGL implementations. Khronos has specified an extension to OpenGL and OpenGL ES, GL_ARB_robustness, designed to prevent denial of service and out-of-range memory access attacks from WebGL content, preventing any possibility of using WebGL to execute malware on a user's machine.
  4. GL_ARB_robustness has already been deployed by some GPU vendors and Khronos expects it to be deployed rapidly by others. Browsers can check for the presence of this extension before enabling WebGL content. This is likely to become the deployment mode for WebGL in the near future.
  5. The ability to incorporate cross-domain images into WebGL scenes provides great utility to developers, but the WebGL working group is considering requiring Cross Origin Resource Sharing (CORS) opt-in or other mechanisms to prevent possible future abuse of this capability.
  6. The WebGL working group has been working closely with the GPU vendors in the Khronos group to make accelerated WebGL implementations secure and WebGL is influencing GPUs to provide even more flexible security options in the future.
  7. There are no known WebGL exploits and Khronos will continue to place close attention to technical and ecosystem opportunities to ensure WebGL is a secure technology that can be used with confidence.

Additional information can be found here.

Updated May 16 2011


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