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Apple to release Snow Leopard with OpenCL in September 2009

Apple announced at the Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) today, they would be releasing the next generation of operating system 'Snow Leopard' this coming September. Included in this major upgrade is the new OpenCL API.
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Could the iPhone Trip While Leaping Forward?

The new iPhone 3G S uses an incompatible graphics library from the previous phones. The iPhone 3G uses the OpenGL ES 1.1 library while the 3G S uses the OpenGL ES 2.0, and the two are not compatible as OpenGL ES 2.0 is a superset of 1.1. This was a deliberate decision by Khronos, so that it could make some large performance improvements. One of the biggest features is the addition of pixel shaders, which gives considerable flexibility in making 3D content. Both Jonathan Hirshon and Jon Peddie weigh in on why this move probably won't be a problem. Link to story in Japanese.
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Apples Snow Leopard promises System Wide support for COLLADA

On the Apple OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard Enhancements and Refinements page, under System Wide Digital Asset Exchange support there is a easily overlooked mention of COLLADA. Users of COLLADA and the file format .dae will be please to see that Preview, OS X's lightway graphic viewer application, will display .dae files with OpenGL-powered 3D graphics. You will be able to zoom and rotate around a 3D scene and play viewpoint animations. There is a good discussion about this over at idevgames.com
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NaviCAD released - allows you to view COLLADA files on the iPhone

NaviCAD is the only way to see Collada models--specifically models from the Google 3D Warehouse--on the iPhone/iPod Touch. NaviCAD has been approved for sale by Apple and is available for download immediately.
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OpenCL Video Tutorial - Introduction to OpenCL

With the launch of Snow Leopard this Friday, now is the time to start getting revved up for some of the new technologies coming with this release. One of them, OpenCL. MacResearch.org has done a great overview of what OpenCL is and a beginners tutorial on how it works and how to use it.
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OpenCL: Parallel programmers’ new best friend

Apple's Snow Leopard hit the streets friday as the first major OS to support OpenCL. OpenCL, the Open Computing Language, was originally proposed by Apple to support parallel programming on GPUs and handed over to the Khronos Group, the same independent standards organization that manages the OpenGL standard for 3D rendering. Support for OpenCL may start with Snow Leopard but it will go well beyond that. AMD and Nvidia will have OpenCL drivers for their GPUs under Windows and Linux. AMD and Intel will support OpenCL on their CPUs (including Intel's Larrabee). AMD has already shipped its first OpenCL implementation for its Athlon and Opteron processors. For those folks with OpenCL already up and running on their Apple computers under Snow Leopard, there are two benchmark applications out, so you can see just what OpenCL can do for you.
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Arstechnica in-depth OpenCL coverage on the Mac platform

Arstechnica has written a 23 page in-depth look at Snow Leopard on OS X. Part of that interesting in-depth look are two pages of in-depth coverage on OpenCL. The article is well written and a good informative read.
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Next generation iPod touts OpenGL ES 2.0

Apple announced a minor upgrade to their iPods today with among other things, an upgrade to support OpenGL ES 2.0. Both the popular iPod Touch and the iPhone now supporting OpenGL ES 2.0 reinforces Apples intent to grab a bigger portion of the mobile gaming market.
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OpenGL ES 1.1 and 2.0 framerate comparison on iPhone 3G and 3GS

iPhones Wikipedia has posted a short video from Tap Tap Tap comparing the framerates between an iPhone 3G running OpenGL ES 1.1 and an iPhone 3GS running OpenGL ES 2.0.
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HPCWire features OpenCL Promises and Potential

While OpenCL is very similar in many respects to NVIDIA's CUDA, it adds features to take advantage of other targets; and though it's quite complex, it has the potential to deliver very high performance, and is much easier than trying to map your computation into OpenGL or graphics primitives. So says Michael Wolfe, with over 30 years in both academia and industry on developing compilers, and is now a senior compiler engineer at The Portland Group, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of STMicroelectronics, Inc.
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