Vulkan tagged news

Vulkan Education Survey!

The Khronos Group is trying to better understand how the community have learnt or is learning to use the Vulkan API. We’d like to gather insight on which resources are most or least useful as well as candid feedback on how we handle Vulkan education in general across a variety of areas. The survey takes approximately 10 - 15 minutes. We hope that you can find the time to complete this short survey, the results of this survey will be used to improve our overall Vulkan education offering as part of a major update to Vulkan web resources next year.

Vendetta Online, the MMO from Guild Software Inc that has supported Linux for a long time is going to add Vulkan support alongside some other fun sounding advancements. For Vulkan support, they’ve already had it working since early 2018 and it recently became optional for Windows players. As they make improvements, it will be rolled out for Linux too. They will still support OpenGL, for now, until some time in future when all development is going into the Vulkan renderer.

The AMD Radeon RX 590 graphics card is built upon 12nm process technology and the advanced AMD “Polaris” architecture, including 4th Gen GCN graphics cores, display engine and multimedia cores to enable exceptional performance in low-level APIs like DirectX 125 and Vulkan. It also provides stunning HD gaming experience running at up to 60 FPS or higher in the most popular AAA games, and up to 100 FPS in some of the most popular eSports titles.

Shader Conductor is one of several open-source projects for going from one shading language to another. With Microsoft’s Shader Conductor the focus is on converting HLSL to GLSL or SPIR-V (OpenGL/Vulkan), ESSL (OpenGL ES), MSL (Apple Metal), and older HLSL shader models. Shader Conductor can handle all shader stages, including geometry and compute shaders. Learn more about this new Open Source project from Microsoft.

Magic Leap has made the session on Seedling from Insomniac Games available to the public. Featuring Joel Bartley, lead gameplay programmer for Insomniac Games, and Michael Liebenow, lead software engineer for Magic Leap, the session examines how to integrate a 3D engine into an app using the Vulkan API. “We support two low-level rendering APIs, both Vulkan and OpenGL, but we feel that Vulkan provides more opportunities for optimization, which is especially important when you’re trying to get all the performance you can out of a mobile system, and that is one of the main reasons why we recommend Vulkan for your development,” said Liebenow during the session.

Samsung has announced an enhanced iteration of the Vulkan API, which offers a 10% performance improvement as compared to the OpenGL ES. Samsung has also announced new features for GPUWatch, a tool that aids developers monitor and measure performance between Vulkan and OpenGL ES.

Unreal Engine 4.21 continues their pursuit of greater efficiency, performance, and stability for every project on any platform. With the help of Samsung, Unreal Engine 4.21 includes all of the Vulkan engineering and optimization work that was done to help ship Fortnite on the Samsung Galaxy Note 9 and is 100% feature compatible with OpenGL ES 3.1. Projects that utilize Vulkan can run up to 20% faster than the same project that uses OpenGL ES.

Qualcomm has introduced the new Qualcomm Snapdragon 675 Mobile Platform. The Snapdragon 675 offers outstanding gaming, a leap in artificial intelligence (AI) capability and a cutting-edge camera. Premium features in the Snapdragon 675 are enabled by the Qualcomm AI Engine, Qualcomm Spectra ISP, Qualcomm Kryo CPU and Qualcomm Adreno GPU. A number of specific games and game engines have been optimized including Unity, Unreal, Messiah, and NeoX. Qualcomm Technologies also supports popular tools and APIs, including Vulkan, OpenGL 3.2, OpenCL, and Snapdragon profiler.

LunarG now delivers native Ubuntu Linux packages for all the elements in the Vulkan SDK in addition to the Linux SDK tarball. Follow the Ubuntu Packages link on the LunarXchange SDK web page to gain access to the native Ubuntu Linux packages. These packages will install pre-built SDK binaries on a system running Ubuntu Linux and contain all the LunarG Vulkan SDK components at the latest available version. For Ubuntu Linux users, this is the most convenient way to get the Linux SDK content since you will not need to build any binaries yourself. Headers, libraries, and tools are included and prebuilt. Read the LunarG blog for more details.

The AMD Developer Tools team has been busy working on many new tools, some of which replicate functionality found in older versions of CodeXL. To limit confusion for our users, several major components have been removed from CodeXL. Graphics Frame Analysis for DirectX 12 and Vulkan applications have been removed and can now be found in the following AMD and third-party tools:
Radeon GPU Profiler, RenderDoc, Microsoft PIX.

The 2018 X.Org Developer’s Conference (XDC2018) videos have now been posted online. XCD 2018 saw many Khronos members sponsor this conference, including Igalia, AMD, Arm, COLLABORA, Google, NVIDIA, Intel and Valve. The talks covered Vulkan, OpenGL, OpenGL ES, OpenCL, SPIR-V, GLSL and OpenXR. We’ve compiled a list of all the videos discussing these Khronos standards here, or you can watch all the videos from the conference on the X.Org Foundation YouTube channel.

NVIDIA’s new Turing GPU unleashed real-time ray-tracing in a consumer GPU for the first time. Since then, much virtual ink has been spilled discussing ray tracing in DirectX 12. However, many developers want to embrace a more open approach using Vulkan, the low-level API supported by the Khronos Group. Vulkan enables developers to target many different platforms, including Windows and Linux, allowing for broader distribution of 3D-accelerated applications. NVIDIA’s 411.63 driver release now enables an experimental Vulkan extension that exposes NVIDIA’s RTX technology for real-time ray tracing through the Vulkan API. Head over to the NVIDIA blog to read all about this update.