Vulkan tagged news

NVIDIA just posted the next installment of their Vulkan tips blog series. This episode talks about memory management. Vulkan offers another key difference to OpenGL with respect to memory allocation. When it comes to managing memory allocations as well as assigning it to individual resources, the OpenGL driver does most of the work for the developer. This allows applications to be developed, tested and deployed very quickly. In Vulkan however, the programmer takes responsibility meaning that many operations that OpenGL orchestrates heuristically can be orchestrated based on an absolute knowledge of the resource lifecycle.

Khronos member Jason Ekstrand from Intel discussed the new Vulkan graphics API and its impact on Open-source software at Fosdem'16 over the weekend. The presentation slides from his talk are now available online.

Croteam, the studio that brought us the amazing Serious Sam series and The Talon Principle, are closely following the development of Vulkan and are prepared to use it. Given their track record, it's very likely that Croteam will be one of the first studios to provide Vulkan support in its games.

At CES 2016, Alex Davies from Tom's Hardware moderated a panel called “What’s Under The Hood” hosted by The Immersive Technology Alliance at VR Fest. After the panel, Alex sat down with Daryl Sartain, Director of Virtual Reality and ITA VR Council Chair at AMD for a one-on-one. Alex and Daryl speak briefly about Vulkan and DX12.

John Carmack is the new CTO of Oculus VR. He’s still coding in his new position though, and yesterday he posted an interesting tweet about Vulkan, mentioning “impressive improvements” on early Vulkan drivers while running native code. He also added that it will be a “big win” once Vulkan gets proper support from popular engines such as Unity 5 and Unreal Engine 4. Last month, Khronos announced that Vulkan 1.0 was almost complete and it would be released in early 2016, with a slight delay over the previous schedule.

AMD Developer Technology Engineer Matthaeus Chajdas will be hosting a lecture at GDC 2016 on Vulkan. Vulkan and DirectX12 are new, low-level APIs which require developers to think about graphics in a new way. In many cases game engines need to be restructured to take advantage of low-level parallel submission, asynchronous execution and new state & resource handling features provided by the API. In this lecture, these new concepts will be reviewed and we will take a look at how launch titles successfully handled the transition to the new APIs. The presentation will include useful insights gained while developing the first wave of Vulkan & DirectX®12 titles.

We have some good news and some bad news. The year-end target release date for Vulkan will not be met. However, we are in the home stretch and the release of Vulkan 1.0 is near!

A more detailed update is available on the Vulkan ecosystem page.

AMD has announce it will start rolling out in January an open source set of tools called GPUOpen. The "All Open" stack will contain open source modules for two parallel stacks, each containing modules for OpenGL graphics, motion video codecs, and OpenCL GPU computation. The "Professional/Gamer" stack will include the open source motion-video module and a closed source OpenGL module. Its final OpenCL module will support both OpenCL and Vulkan. Linux will gain access to a full open source, high-performance driver stack, with the only constraint being that developers must use Vulkan instead of the older OpenGL.

Imagination Technologies introduces another installment in their Vulkan series. In this post Tobias will be doing some analysis of why and how Vulkan is an explicit API, and what exactly that means. There is a lot of mention of Vulkan being a low-level API, and in some ways that’s true, but a lot of work is still abstracted from developers to handle cross-vendor compatibility.

It's been a very busy few weeks for the Khronos Group chapters. We've added three new chapters: Paris France, Washington DC and Wroclaw Poland. There is a good selection of upcoming meetups as well:

- Computer Graphics on the Web: Dec 8, 2015 - Melbourne, Australia
- First Khronos Wroclaw meetup + VR: Dec 9, 2015 - Wroclaw, Poland
- Image Processing with WebGL: Dec 10, 2015 - London, Britain
- WebGL Developers Meetup: Dec 17, 2015 - Milano, Italy
- OpenGL for beginners part 1: Jan 06th, 2016 - Naritaweg, Amsterdam

Errata: We originally said Seattle Washington... our mistake, our latest chapter is in Washington DC.