Vulkan tagged news

NVIDIA announced Nsight Graphics 2018.4, the first public release of GPU Trace. This release also adds D3D12 Pixel history, supports NVIDIA’s Vulkan ray tracing extension, completes support for the D3D12 RS3 SDK, and improves performance for D3D11 and Vulkan debugging and profiling. Additionally, with this release, the Nsight family of tools is being re-versioned to a year dot release number versioning scheme.

Pumex 0.2.0 - Vulkan renderer releasedPumex is a cross-platform renderer that facilitates implementation of different rendering algorithms through the use of render workflow ( aka frame graph ) and simple scene graph. It may render results in parallel to many surfaces at once. Data update stage with user defined constant time step works in parallel to rendering. Pumex delivers extensive set of timeline statistics to help user with bottleneck identification. Renderer is implemented using Vulkan API and modern C++ language ( C++11 to C++17 ).

Khronos at SIGGRAPH 2018–Next week!SIGGRAPH is next week! The conference is August 12–16 in Vancouver Canada. For those going, Khronos will be hosting several Birds of a Feather sessions. For all those folks that will not be present, we will be offering live streaming of all our sessions (glTF, WebGL, OpenXR, Vulkan and OpenGL) on the Khronos Group YouTube Channel, and will follow up with recorded video the following week. For complete details on all the sessions, please ask your friends and co-workers to take a look at our SIGGRAPH event page! A special thanks to our Diamond sponsor NVIDIA, Gold Sponsor LunarG, and Silver sponsors Cesium and AMD, for making possible the Khronos Networking Reception at the end of the day.

ogldev: Vulkan triangle tutorial publishedThe 52nd tutorial from ogldev.org on rendering a triangle in Vulkan has been published. In the previous tutorial we learned how to clear the window and were introduced to a couple of Vulkan entities that are key parts of that operation - the swap chain and the command buffer. This will require the introduction of four new Vulkan entities - the image view, render pass, framebuffer and the pipeline.

Rys Sommefeldt, who looks after the Game Engineering group in Europe which is part of the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD, has written a short blog on decoding radeon Vulkan versions. Rys writes "We have a practical problem that will be familiar to anyone in the midst of developing any complex packaged software: we need to ship multiple driver components developed at different cadences and in certain ways, all packaged together and distributed, to be installed as a unit." Read on to learn about his solution.

Think Silicon, a leader in developing ultra-low power graphics IP technology, gladly announces the release of GLOVE (GL Over Vulkan), as open source. GLOVE is a middleware, which allows developers for Android, Linux and Windows operating systems to run OpenGL ES seamlessly on supported hardware by translating at runtime OpenGL ES API calls to Vulkan API commands for that platform.

The glTF session at SIGGRAPH may only be 50 minutes long, but it will be action packed. Don't miss this years fast moving glTF session with these speakers:

  • Ecosystem update: Patrick Cozzi, Cesium
  • glTF for artists: Patrick Ryan, Microsoft
  • TurboSquid - Beau Perschall
  • Facebook - Pär Winzell
  • Microsoft - Gary Hsu and Cedric Caillaud
  • STK - Alex Wood, AGI
  • VSCode - Ed Mackey, AGI
  • Industrial AR with glTF - Johannes Beh, Fraunhofer
  • Google Draco - Frank Galligan
  • Texture transmission - Mark Callow
  • IKEA - Martin Enthed
Be the first to learn about updates to our BOF Day and Networking Reception at SIGGRAPH by bookmarking our event page or signing up to our mailing list.

If you're a game developer and not yet up to speed on Vulkan*, you should be. Vulkan APIs are one of the industry's hottest new technologies. They support multithreaded programming, simplify cross-platform development and have the backing of makers of major chips, GPUs, and devices. Vulkan APIs are positioned to become one of the next dominant graphics rendering platforms. Characteristics of the platform help apps gain longevity and run in more places. You might say that Vulkan lets apps live long and prosper—and this code sample will help get you started.

Magic Leap released a handful of tutorials and assets files that will help developers get a head-start in creating mixed reality content on Magic Leap One. Magic Leap said that Unity and Unreal already offer optimizations for Magic Leap hardware. The headset has full support for OpenGL 4.5 and OpenGL ES 3.1, but Magic Leap recommends building applications with the Vulkan API for the best performance.

Adam Sawicki, a member of AMD RTG’s Game Engineering team, has spent the best part of a year assisting one of the world’s biggest game studios in porting one of their AAA games to the Khronos Vulkan API. That kind of experience — embedded with the game developer and working hands-on in their codebase alongside their own engineers — is always worth sharing whenever possible. Adam has turned what he learned into a general presentation aimed at those looking to port a game engine to either Vulkan or DirectX 12.