Tutorials tagged news

In this short tutorial Intel gives you a brief introduction to Khronos SPIR-V, touches on the differences between a SPIR-V binary and a SPIR binary, and demonstrates a couple of ways of creating SPIR-V binaries using tools shipped with the latest Intel SDK for OpenCL Applications and ways of consuming SPIR-V binaries in your OpenCL program.

Neil Trevett, President of the Khronos Group, presents the "Vision API Maze: Options and Trade-offs" video tutorial, (free registration required) at the May 2016 Embedded Vision Summit. In this presentation, Neil Trevett, President of the Khronos Group standards organization, updates the landscape of APIs for vision software development, explaining where each one fits in the development flow. Neil also highlights where these APIs overlap and where they complement each other, and previews some of the latest developments in these APIs.

Debugging with Intel SDK for OpenCL Applications: This video demonstrate how to use Intel SDK for OpenCL API debugger to debug your application’s host code and how to use Intel SDK for OpenCL CPU Kernel Debugger to debug your OpenCL kernels. Performance Analysis with Intel SDK for OpenCL Applications: This video demonstrate how to use Intel SDK for OpenCL analysis tools to identify performance bottlenecks in the host API calls and optimize the kernel code to get better utilization and reduce the latency on Intel® Processor Graphics.

Tutorial on offline debugging with Vulkan using VK_EXT_debug_marker and RenderDocThis tutorial demonstrates the new functionality introduced with the VK_EXT_debug_marker extensions (added with Vulkan 1.0.12) for offline debugging. The first part talks about the new functionality of the debug marker extension and shows how to implement it in an example application using C++ (sources and binaries included). The second part of the tutorial then shows how this information can be used with offline graphics debuggers like RenderDoc.

OpenVX Tutorial Videos from 2016 Embedded Vision Summit now onlineKhronos sponsored a day long course covering both the function-based API and the graph API that enable OpenVX developers to efficiently run computer vision algorithms on heterogeneous computing architectures. One section explains the tutorial exercises with a VirtualBox VM, which can be downloaded from the tutorial on Github. The Embedded Vision Summit schedule is located here, the tutorial is on Github and the associated videos from the day long tutorial are available on Youtube.

Khronos is proud to be a sponsor of the Embedded Vision Summit on May 2-4 2016 in Santa Clara, CA. The Khronos OpenVX working group will be running an in-depth OpenVX tutorial at this highly focused event. The OpenVX workshop is being held on the final day of the Embedded Vision Summit, and includes tutorials on the OpenVX architecture, a hands-on lab to try out real-world examples of OpenVX acceleration, and tips to deploy OpenVX in your own applications and products.

Advanced Hands-On OpenCL Tutorial To Kick-Off IWOCL 2016The organisers of IWOCL 2016 (“eye-wok-ul”), the International Workshop on OpenCL announced that registration is now open for the “Advanced Hands-On OpenCL Tutorial”. The tutorial focuses on advanced OpenCL concepts and is an extension of the highly successful ‘Hands on OpenCL’ course which has received over 6,500 downloads from GitHub. Simon McIntosh-Smith, Associate Professor in High Performance Computing at the University of Bristol and one of the tutorial authors will lead the sessions. The full-day Advanced Hands-On OpenCL tutorial takes place on Tuesday 19th April at the C3 Conference Center in Vienna, Austria. The tutorial can also be combined with attendance at the full IWOCL event.

Khronos BoF, Tutorial and OpenCL Booth #285 at SC15Khronos will be on the west side of the SC15 hall in booth #285. Technical experts will be available to answer your questions and there will be OpenCL 2.1 and SYCL reference guides to give away. The Khronos BOF "Flocking Together: Experience the Diverse OpenCL Ecosystem" starts off with an overview of the OpenCL 2.1 C++ kernel language, the SYCL 2.1 abstraction layer, and SPIR. Following the presentation, attendees are invited to bring their code and their toughest questions. Attendees will have the opportunity to experiment with implementations and tools from multiple vendors across several platforms. The BoF session is geared for those experienced with OpenCL, it will also provide an opportunity for newcomers to ask questions both basic and technical of our experts from the OpenCL working group as well as those from various participating vendors. Be sure to visit the Khronos DevU tutorial "Portable programs for heterogeneous computing: a hands-on introduction" on Monday November 16th. Details on all of these events and much more are available on the official Khronos event page.

CSS-Tricks has a guest post by Matt DesLauriers on rendering SVG paths in WebGL. Matt discusses some of the tools and ideas involved in making it happen, as well as other approaches and other related concepts.

Now in its fourth year, the International Workshop on OpenCL will be held in Vienna, Austria, at the C3 Convention Center on April 19-21. April 19th is reserved for an Advanced Hands On OpenCL tutorial with April 20th – 21st consisting of a mix of keynotes, academic papers, technical presentations, tutorials and poster sessions. We are inviting high-quality submissions in four categories: Full Academic Papers; Technical Presentations; Tutorials; Posters.

COLLADA already supports exchanging shaders between 3D tools, however some applications and game engines are not capable of exporting and importing shaders to and from the COLLADA .dae format. This COLLADA tutorial will walk you through the steps supported Cinema 4D.

Altera has a free to download OpenCL Tutorial. The tutorial covers ways that you can use OpenCL to target an FPGA to create custom accelerated systems with an average of one fifth the power of competing accelerators; Trends that make FPGAs an important resource for accelerating software execution and How OpenCL makes accelerations accessible to software developers.