SYCL tagged news

The Khronos Group, an open consortium of leading hardware and software companies, announces the immediate availability of the OpenCL™ 2.2, SYCL™ 2.2 and SPIR-V™ 1.1 provisional specifications. OpenCL 2.2 incorporates the OpenCL C++ kernel language for significantly enhanced parallel programming productivity. SYCL 2.2 enables host and device code to be contained in a single source file, while leveraging the full power of OpenCL C++. SPIR-V 1.1 extends the intermediate representation defined by Khronos with native support for shader and compute kernel features to fully support the OpenCL C++ kernel language. These new specifications can be found at www.khronos.org and are released in provisional form to enable developers and implementers to provide feedback before finalization, including at the Khronos forums.

Codeplay Software today announced ComputeCpp, an easy-to-use standards-based product for lowering the power consumption and increasing the performance of C++ software. The first commercial release of ComputeCpp will support SYCL for OpenCL, the open-standard C++ programming model from The Khronos Group. SYCL allows C++ application developers to write high-performance modern C++ and deploy it to multiple processor cores without hardware-specific rewrites or optimizations. The Khronos Group just released SYCL 1.2 Final Specification.

The Khronos Group announced the ratification and public release of the finalized SYCL 1.2 specification. SYCL for OpenCL enables code for heterogeneous processors to be written in a "single-source" style using completely standard C++. The multi-vendor SYCL 1.2 standard is available royalty-free for industry use, and the full specification together with details about the SYCL conformance test suite and Adopters Program can be found on the Khronos Group SYCL page.

The Khronos Group today announced the ratification and public release of updated OpenCL 2.0 and Provisional SYCL 1.2 specifications. The new specifications integrate feedback from the developer community, align with the latest C++ developments, and increase implementation consistency for improved portability of heterogeneous parallel applications. The latest OpenCL and SYCL specifications are open, royalty-free and available today.

The Khronos™ Group today announced the ratification and public release of updated OpenCL™ 2.0 and Provisional SYCL™ 1.2 specifications. The new specifications integrate feedback from the developer community, align with the latest C++ developments, and increase implementation consistency for improved portability of heterogeneous parallel applications. The latest OpenCL and SYCL specifications are open, royalty-free and available online.

The Khronos Group today announced a number of new and significant updates to its portfolio of open, royalty free industry standards that enable the authoring and acceleration of parallel computing, graphics, vision, sensor processing and dynamic media on a wide variety of platforms and devices:

Khronos Releases SYCL 1.2 Provisional SpecificationThe Khronos Group today announced the release of SYCL 1.2 as a provisional specification to enable community feedback. SYCL is a royalty-free, cross-platform abstraction layer that enables the development of applications and frameworks that build on the underlying concepts, portability and efficiency of OpenCL, while adding the ease-of-use and flexibility of C++. Feedback is welcome and encouraged on the official feedback forum.

March 19, 2014 – San Francisco, Game Developer’s Conference – The Khronos™ Group today announced the release of SYCL™ 1.2 as a provisional specification to enable community feedback. SYCL is a royalty-free, cross-platform abstraction layer that enables the development of applications and frameworks that build on the underlying concepts, portability and efficiency of OpenCL™, while adding the ease-of-use and flexibility of C++. For example, SYCL can provide single source development where C++ template functions can contain both host and device code to construct complex algorithms that use OpenCL acceleration - and then enable re-use of those templates throughout the source code of an application to operate on different types of data.