OpenGL tagged news

While current generation Linux games with current Linux GPU drivers using the Vulkan API rather than OpenGL may not be significantly faster with higher-end hardware right, the impact of this newer Khronos graphics API tends to be more profound on lower-end hardware, especially when it comes to lightening the load on the CPU. Following recent Pentium vs. Ryzen 3 Linux gaming tests, Phoronix carried out some fresh benchmarks looking at OpenGL vs. Vulkan on the Ryzen 3 1200 quad-core CPU with NVIDIA and Radeon graphics.

KDAB Introduction to Modern OpenGL - March 20-22, 2018This three-day training provides a comprehensive introduction to modern OpenGL development. The course begins with basic concepts and includes all the fundamental topics needed to develop flexible, high performance OpenGL code that can run on the desktop and embedded / mobile devices. Key techniques including lighting, texturing, framebuffer objects and transformations are introduced, in a format suitable for any developer working in C or C++. For more information including how to register, or to discuss other OpenGL and related trainings offered by KDAB, please get in touch via the web page.

There is a new optimized OpenGL/Graphics Math for C. The original glm library is for C++ only (templates, namespaces, classes...). This new library is targeted to C99 but currently you can use it for C89 safely by language extensions. Almost all functions (inline versions) and parameters are documented inside related headers. Complete documentation is in progress. Feedback is welcome on the OpenGL forums.

Plumeria Smart Creator 3.3 has been released. It features an error free visual programming experience with an infinite loop AI, a crash preventer, and a syntax error blocker. New to version 3.3 is a full 3D Physics motion engine with oriented bounding boxes and spheres. It also includes the Apple Attack Pack with three free games all made entirely in PlumeriaSC 3.3. Apple Attack, which has just been released, presents Grandma Smith who is trying to vacuum her apples from her apple trees before aliens destroy them.

Remograph released Remo 3D v2.7Remograph, providers of products and services for the computer graphics, visual simulation and 3D modeling markets, announced the release of Remo 3D v2.7. Remo 3D is an effective OpenGL-based tool for creating and modifying 3D models intended for realtime visualization. The primary file format is OpenFlight. Remo 3D is currently available for Microsoft Windows 10/8/7 and Linux. This new version 2.7 of Remo 3D brings brings a greatly improved tool for modifying a texture UV mapping, support for new OpenSceneGraph 3.5.9 and other various fixes. The full list of new features and improvements can be found in the release notes on our website.

Geeks 3D has a great overview of the new OpenGL and Vulkan features in the AMD Adrenalin 17.12.1 release. AMD has added some OpenGL 4.6 extensions (GL_ARB_gl_spirv) but not all, so Adrenalin 17.12.1 is still an OpenGL 4.5 driver with OpenGL 4.6 features. This driver exposes 319 OpenGL extensions (GL=294 and WGL=25) for a Radeon RX 470 on Windows 10 64-bit. Adrenalin 17.12.1 also exposes Vulkan 1.0.65 which is one of the latest specifications. Vulkan support has been added to Radeon Overlay, Radeon Relive, Enhanced Sync and Frame rate target control.

Google launched Android Studio 3.0, the latest version of its integrated development environment (IDE). Included in this update is OpenGL ES 3.0 support for Android Oreo system images along with significant improvements in OpenGL ES 2.0 graphics performance for older emulator system images.

Dell Technologies is excited to join the Khronos Group and actively contribute to innovation in xR. Joining the Khronos Group provides a forum to drive critical and strategic requirements for open standards run by the Khronos Group such as OpenXR and OpenGL, said Liam Quinn, CTO for the Client Solutions Group.

How The Khronos Group Intends to get us to a unified graphics futureNeil Trevett, President of The Khronos Group, talks to Architosh in this two-part series about OpenGL and the future of graphics standards. On the eve of SIGGRAPH 2017 Neil Trevett spoke to Architosh about the evolving OpenGL standard as well as directions the group is taking to plot a path for a universal graphics API that engages the use of low-level APIs. Read more about why OpenGL isn't packing for retirement just yet a the key thing in OpenGL 4.6 is SPIR-V is part of core.

WebAssembly support in Magnum OpenGL graphics engineThe open source C++11/C++14 and OpenGL graphics engine Magnum recently added first-class WebAssembly support. An article on the official blog explains how to easily compile your C++ projects to WebAssembly, compares it to asm.js and mentions a few useful tips for best online experience. Last but not least, there's a bunch of online demos that use both WebGL 1 and 2, showing how a single codebase can be run both natively and in the browser.

SilverLining 5.0 SDK Simulates Storm Clouds in OpenGLSundog Software released version 5.0 of the SilverLining Sky, 3D Cloud, and Weather SDK, featuring support for OpenGL 2.0 through 4.5. SilverLining is a C++ library that simulates real-time skies for any given time, location, and weather conditions. It implements a variety of volumetric rendering techniques to represent many different 3D cloud types in a physically realistic manner from any angle, while maintaining high frame-rates. SilverLining 5 introduces new hand-modeled storm clouds suitable for use in flight simulators. Large, natural-looking cumulonimbus thunderheads and towering cumulus clouds in various stages of development are included. SilverLining integrates into any OpenGL application easily with simple calls to initialize, update, and draw its skies, clouds, and precipitation effects. Integration code for OpenSceneGraph is included. SilverLining is widely used in the training and simulation industry, and powers the popular "SkyMaxx Pro" add-on for the X-Plane flight simulator.

Pro Tip: Linking OpenGL for Server-Side RenderingVisualization is a great tool for understanding large amounts of data, but transferring the data from an HPC system or from the cloud to a local workstation for analysis can be a painful experience. Analyzing and visualizing data right where it is generated and using server-side rendering lets you deliver high quality visual content to any client hardware. Whether it’s a DGX station or a smartphone. With the arrival of EGL, taking advantage of OpenGL on a headless server has become even simpler, making it unnecessary to run an X server or any other tools. Slight modifications to your OpenGL context management code using EGL functions is required as described in this post. Using EGL also requires you to link your application to different libraries. This post from NVIDIA is about how to correctly link a modern OpenGL application.