OpenGL ES tagged news

Basemark launches Rocksolid, a high performance and high availability graphics rendering solution for industrial applications. With Rocksolid, customers can achieve typically 2X to 3X performance increases for their existing applications. In some cases, up to 10X performance increases have been attained. Cross-Platform and Graphics API Agnostic, Rocksolid runs on Windows, Linux, Android, macOS and uses any one of Vulkan, OpenGL, OpenGL ES, DirectX or Metal.

Imagination Technologies latest blog is broken into two parts: The first part discusses issues related to the artist and the production of game scene assets. The second part describes the software engineering project to integrate the Unreal Engine with Imagination’s PowerVR GR6500 Wizard development hardware, and their Vulkan driver with their proposed ray tracing API extensions, in order to demonstrate ray tracing functionality running in a well-known game engine.

Already supported by production browsers from Google and Mozilla, the WebGL 2.0 standard is final and now ready for developers to create the next wave of 3D web applications and engines. WebGL 2.0 exposes OpenGL ES 3.0-class functionality, bringing desktop-OpenGL capabilities to web developers everywhere. Additionally, Khronos has now started work on the next generation of WebGL to bring the power of the new generation of explicit 3D APIs to the Web. More information on WebGL 2.0 is available in the Khronos Blog.

With the release of Firefox 51, WebGL 2.0 support has landed! WebGL is a standard API to render 3D graphics in the Web. To date, we have been able to use WebGL 1.0 (based on OpenGL ES 2) to render fancy graphics into a <canvas> element. WebGL 2.0, however, is based on the OpenGL ES 3.0 specification, which introduces new features – many of them aimed at increasing performance and visual fidelity.