OpenGL ES tagged news

With the release of Firefox 51, WebGL 2.0 support has landed! WebGL is a standard API to render 3D graphics in the Web. To date, we have been able to use WebGL 1.0 (based on OpenGL ES 2) to render fancy graphics into a <canvas> element. WebGL 2.0, however, is based on the OpenGL ES 3.0 specification, which introduces new features – many of them aimed at increasing performance and visual fidelity.

Shaderific now with support for Conway’s Game of LifeShaderific version 4.1 is now available. Shaderific is an educational app for iPad, iPhone and iPod touch that makes it possible to write, compile and test OpenGL ES 2.0 and OpenGL ES 3.0 shader programs directly on any iOS device. Version 4.1 adds full support for iOS 10. Furthermore, the release includes a new shader for Conway's Game of Life that demonstrates the use of the newly introduced custom uniforms. The cell size can be determinded and shadow effects can be enabled to provide a variety of beautiful rendering options. To provide full flexibilty to the user Shaderifc now supports importing Game of Life patterns in the form of text files. The patterns are automatically converted to textures that can be used as start configurations.

HoloJS is a framework for creating UWP applications using JavaScript and WebGL. HoloJS is a C++ library that hosts Chakra to run JavaScript code, and also hosts ANGLE to handle OpenGL ES graphics calls.

The biggest new feature of Mesa 13.0.0 is OpenGL 4.4 and OpenGL 4.5 capability. Equally big news includes OpenGL ES 3.2 support for Intel Skylake or later, OpenGL ES 3.1 support for Intel Haswell, Windows-DRI support to the GLX component, as well as KHR_no_config_context and EGL_KHR_debug support for EGL component. The Mesa EGL interface also received support for EGL_MESA_platform_surfaceless.

The second Release Candidate (RC) milestone of the upcoming Mesa 3D 13.0.0 Graphics Library has been announced. Changes implemented in Mesa 13.0.0 RC2 include the move of the BlendBarrier and PrimitiveBoundingBox definitions into the ES3.2 category for GLAPI, export of all GLES (OpenGL ES) 3.2 functions in the libGLESv2.so library, and the set of the VISIBILITY_CFLAGS argument for shared GLAPI to the automake file the MAPI generic OpenVG dispatcher.

Vulkan API supports multithreading, which is particularly important for mobile platforms. Multithreading enables the system to balance the workload across multiple CPUs, allowing for lower voltage and frequency. The results give considerable energy savings compared to OpenGL ES API. In this video from ARM, you can see just how big a difference there is between OpenGL ES and Vulkan.