OpenCL tagged news

Amazon AppStream 2.0 is introducing Graphics Desktop and Graphics Pro instance families to deliver high performance graphics applications from AWS. The Graphics Desktop instance family offers a single instance type with an NVIDIA GPU based on K520 with 1,536 CUDA cores, 8 vCPUs, 15 GiB system memory, and 4 GiB graphics memory. This instance type is ideal for running desktop graphics applications such as Siemens NX, SolidWorks, ESRI ArcGIS, and other applications that use DirectX, OpenGL, OpenCL, and CUDA.

In collaboration with Google, Codeplay is proud to announce the release of a new open-source tool allowing the compilation of OpenCL C language kernels to run on the Vulkan API. The tool, named 'clspv', allows a subset of the OpenCL C language to be targeted at the Vulkan API. This tool allows developers to port code containing more than a million lines of OpenCL C to run on the Vulkan API. The source is available on Github.

Radeon ProRender is a powerful physically-based rendering engine that enables creative professionals to produce stunningly photorealistic images. Built on efficient, high-performance Radeon Rays technology, Radeon ProRender’s complete, scalable ray tracing engine uses open industry standards to harness GPU and CPU performance for swift, impressive results. One of those open industry standards is OpenCL 1.2. AMD's requirements state: "Hardware agnostic – if your computer can run OpenCL 1.2, it can run Radeon ProRender." Download the Windows or Linux version directly or learn more about Radeon Pro.

Synopsys announced that it has enhanced the convolutional neural network (CNN) engine in its DesignWare EV6x Vision Processors to address the increasing video resolution and frame rate requirements of high-performance embedded vision applications. To simplify software application development, the EV6x processors are supported by a comprehensive suite of tools and software. Combined with software development tools based on OpenVX, OpenCV and OpenCL C embedded vision standards, the MetaWare EV Development Toolkit offers a full suite of tools needed to accelerate embedded software development.

Apple announced several updates to the Mac lineup earlier this month at WWDC. Geekbench 4, which includes a new GPU Compute Benchmark that measures the performance of GPUs at performing compute tasks, shows that GPU performance with OpenCL has improved considerably with an increase of up to 80% when compared to the equivalent 2015 model. If you’re interested in how your computer compares you can download Geekbench 4. Find the complete benchmark results on the Geekbench website.

The first edition of IWOCL news since IWOCL 2017 in Toronto is now out. Highlights from the newsletter include a special thanks to everyone who participated and helped make the event such a great success, and links to all the slides and presentations made at the event.

Futuremark is launching PCMark 10, their seventh major update to the PCMark series of benchmarks first launched in 2002. PCMark 10 builds upon the PCMark 8 platform, adds a few workloads and streamlines the rest in order to present a vendor-neutral, complete, and easy-to-use benchmark for home and office environments. Anandtech has a nice review showing a little bit of OpenGL and OpenCL usage.

PC Perspective had the opportunity to have a phone interview with Neil Trevett, president of the Khronos Group and chairman of the OpenCL working group, and Tom Olson, chairman of the Vulkan working group. While OpenCL is planning to merge into the Vulkan API, the Khronos Group wants to make it clear that “all of the merging” is coming from the OpenCL working group. The Vulkan API roadmap is not affected by this decision. Of course, the Vulkan working group will be able to take advantage of technologies that are dropping into their lap, but those discussions have not even begun yet. Read the entire post to learn more about the exciting future of OpenCL and Vulkan.

The Intel Compute Library for Deep Neural Networks (clDNN) is an open source performance library for Deep Learning (DL) applications intended for acceleration of DL inference on Intel® Processor Graphics (Intel® HD Graphics and Intel® Iris® and Intel® Iris® Pro). clDNN includes highly optimized building blocks to implement convolutional neural networks (CNN) with C and C++ interfaces. This library is also used in the Deep Learning Toolkit found in the Intel Computer Vision SDK Beta. The clDNN library can be accessed at github. To learn more on how to use clDNN see whitepaper

The Generic Graphics Library (GEGL) is best known as the backend for image processing software Gimp. GEGL is a graph based image processing framework that allows users to chain together image processing operations represented by nodes into a graph. It provides operations for loading and storing images, adjusting colors, filtering in different ways, transforming and compositing images. GEGL-OpenCL is an educational initiative that aims to get more developers to study and use OpenCL in their projects.

Khronos Releases OpenCL 2.2 With SPIR-V 1.2The Khronos Group announces the immediate availability of the finalized OpenCL™ 2.2 specification, incorporating industry feedback received from developers during the provisional specification review period. In addition to releasing the specification in final form, Khronos has, for the first time, released the full source of the specifications and conformance tests for OpenCL 2.2 onto GitHub to enable deeper community engagement. The conformance tests for OpenCL versions 1.2, 2.0 and 2.1 have also been released on GitHub with more open-source releases to follow. The Windsor Testing Framework, also released today, enables developers to quickly install and configure the OpenCL Conformance Test Suite on their own systems. Developers who know OpenCL C and plan to port their kernels to OpenCL C++, the OpenCL C to OpenCL C++ Porting Guidelines have been released.

Imagination PowerVR Series8XT IP core on Furian GPU supporting Vulkan, OpenCL and OpenVXImagination Technologies announces the first GPU IP core based on its new PowerVR Furian architecture, the Series8XT GT8525. Says Tatiana Solokhina, CTO, RnD Center ELVEES, a Khronos member: “As a provider of SoCs for a wide range of global video analytics applications, we require a GPU that offers the best compute performance in a power constrained footprint. The new PowerVR Furian 8XT family from Imagination provides us an industry-leading GPU with new ALU for increased performance density and efficiency. In addition, support for standard compute APIs such as OpenVX enables easy implementation of real world vision processing applications.” Furian is designed to address the increasing compute requirements across multiple applications and market segments with efficient use of compute APIs including OpenCL 2.0, Vulkan 1.0 and OpenVX 1.1.