Gaming tagged news

Goo Technologies creates HTML 5 high-end graphics for games and interactive visualizations on the Web and is the company behind the Goo Engine. The findings of their 2013 State of Browser Gaming Index are out, and guess what, over half of americans play browser based games. This bodes well for WebGL. Goo Technologies is a web technology company whose aim is to make all digital experiences instantly available on all devices, everywhere using HTML5 and WebGL.

Artillery gaming company is made up of former Google and Facebook engineers and Sean "Day[9]" Plott--host of StarCraft strategy webshow The Day[9] Daily--as lead game designer, plans to use WebGL and HTML5 to create console-quality games for browsers. While little is known about the game, Artillery's mission statement is "dragging core gaming kicking and screaming into the browser using the latest HTML5 and WebGL technology".

Mozilla is investing in Firefox OS which explains why the company has been working on WebGL, in order to bring 3D graphics to the browser, Emscripten, a tool for compiling C++ applications into JavaScript, and asm.js, a high performance subset of JavaScript. Mozilla also announced at GDC that it has been working with Epic Games to port the Unreal 3 engine to the Web.

World Wide Maze is a pretty basic ball-rolling game, but at it's core is something quite interesting. The first is a link to the mobile version of Chrome that turns your smartphone into a PC game controller. The second is of course that World Wide Maze works off the WebGL standard, and it requires pretty decent system specs for a browser game, including 1GB of RAM and a 256MB graphics card for hardware acceleration.

NME 3.5.5 has been released with WebGL support. NME is a framework for building games and applications for mobile, desktop and web platforms. OpenGLView was introduced in NME 3.5, and support for HTML5, using WebGL has now been added. The new “HerokuShaders” sample is a great cross-platform illustration of GLSL shaders at work. The sample will run on Windows, Mac, Linux, BlackBerry and HTML5, and will run on other mobile platforms once GLES2 support is official.

The free WebGL 3D engine CopperLicht has just been released by Ambiera in version 1.6. CopperLicht now supports Particle Systems (a technique for rendering effects like fire, smoke, rain and snow), and includes improvements like 600% faster Billboard rendering. The 3D engine is now fully compatible to the also recently released WebGL editor CopperCube 4. The CopperLicht SDK can be downloaded and used freely.

With the release of Mozilla's Firefox 15, comes a new demo 'The BananaBread', a 3D first-person shooter. This demo offers a compelling example of what developers can presently achieve with WebGL and compressed textures. The BananaBread engine is a JavaScript and WebGL port of the 3D game engine used in Cube 2: Sauerbraten. The initial port was accomplished by a Mozilla researcher using Emscripten, a sophisticated LLVM-based tool for transpiling conventional C/C++ code into JavaScript.

As Henrik points out in a video soundbyte, making amazing 3D graphics as easy to create as “view source” has got to be good for humanity, right?