GPU tagged news

The OpenCL support by NNVM & TVM session from Linaro Connect 2018 in Hong Kong is now online. Abstract: To use mobile GPU to accelerate deep learning inference on ARM platforms in device side, OpenCL support seems a proper and promising fit. NNVM is an open compiler for AI frameworks with graph IR implementation, and TVM is an open source end-to-end Tensor IR/DSL stack. NNVM together with TVM provides a flexible architecture to support different frameworks and backends. OpenCL is one of the supported backends by NNVM & TVM now, the latest status and some how-tos will be discussed in this session.

AMD is announcing the release of V-EZ, a middleware layer that significantly reduces the house-keeping overhead of Vulkan making it easier to use and more accessible to a broader base of developers. V-EZ will still retain the most powerful capabilities of Vulkan but with a simplified API that can be mixed with standard Vulkan where needed. Read on to learn more about some of V-EZ’s key technical features.

Apple announced several updates to the Mac lineup earlier this month at WWDC. Geekbench 4, which includes a new GPU Compute Benchmark that measures the performance of GPUs at performing compute tasks, shows that GPU performance with OpenCL has improved considerably with an increase of up to 80% when compared to the equivalent 2015 model. If you’re interested in how your computer compares you can download Geekbench 4. Find the complete benchmark results on the Geekbench website.

NVIDIA GPU Technology Conference lists additional Khronos Technology sessionsThe GPU Technology Conference (GTC2017) will be running from May 8-11 this year in San Jose Convention Center. This year will see many sessions related to Khronos Technology including OpenCL, OpenGL, OpenVX, Vulkan and WebGL. NVIDIA has just added more sessions to their schedule. Check a list of Khronos related sessions on the Khronos site, or visit the NVIDIA GTC site to see all sessions.

The GPU Technology Conference (GTC2017) will be running from May 8-11 this year in San Jose Convention Center. This year will see many sessions related to Khronos Technology including OpenCL, OpenGL, OpenVX, Vulkan and WebGL. Check a list of Khronos technology only sessions on the Khronos site, or visit the NVIDIA GTC site to see all sessions.

At GDC 2017, in San Francisco during February, Khronos™ released several new Vulkan® extensions for cross-platform Virtual Reality rendering and multiple GPU access. This functionality has been initially released as KHX extensions to enable feedback from the developer community before being incorporated into final specifications. One key question that we have been asked since GDC is whether the Vulkan multi-GPU functionality is specifically tied to ship only on Windows 10.

Furian is designed to address the increasing compute requirements across multiple applications and market segments with efficient use of compute APIs including OpenCL 2.0, Vulkan 1.0 and OpenVX 1.1*. Furian adds a bi-directional GPU/CPU coherent interface for efficient sharing of data; and a transition to user mode queues from kernel mode queues which reduces latency and CPU utilization for compute operations. Based on a published Khronos specification, GPUs based on the PowerVR Furian architecture are expected to pass the Khronos Conformance Testing Process. Current conformance status can be found at www.khronos.org/conformance.

Amazon EC2 users will soon have the ability to add OpenGL acceleration to existing EC2 instance types. Amazon-optimized OpenGL library will automatically detect and make use of Elastic GPUs. Amazon will start out with Windows support for OpenGL, and plan to add support for the Amazon Linux AMI and other versions of OpenGL after that. The GPU added to the instance can have 1, 2, 4, or 8 gigabytes of video memory. It’s becoming much easier to use OpenGL from GPUs in the cloud.

Phoronix has published benchmarks of 13 Kepler/Maxwell/Pascal NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards when testing Blender 2.78's OpenCL renderer. Unfortunately, no AMD OpenCL benchmarks for Blender yet -- the current open-source stack doesn't work until ROCm OpenCL support comes into play and the AMDGPU-PRO stack wasn't working for Blender OpenCL but was falling back to CPU rendering. Read the complete article.

AMD post from October explaining Vulkan's Barrier system. Vulkan’s barrier system is unique as it not only requires you to provide what resources are transitioning, but also specify a source and destination pipeline stage. This allows for more fine-grained control of when a transition is executed. However, you can also leave quite some performance on the table if you just use the simple way, so today we’re going to look at vkCmdPipelineBarrier in detail.