Cloud tagged news

Amazon recently announced a developer preview of their new F1 instance. Equipped with Intel Broadwell E5 2686 v4 processors (2.3 GHz base speed, 2.7 GHz Turbo mode on all cores, and 3.0 GHz Turbo mode on one core), up to 976 GB of memory, up to 4 TB of NVMe SSD storage, and one to eight FPGAs, the F1 instances provide you with plenty of resources to complement your core, FPGA-based logic. The specs on the Xilinx FPGA are: Xilinx UltraScale+ VU9P fabricated using a 16 nm process; 64 GiB of ECC-protected memory on a 288-bit wide bus (four DDR4 channels); Dedicated PCIe x16 interface to the CPU; Approximately 2.5 million logic elements; Approximately 6,800 Digital Signal Processing (DSP) engines; Virtual JTAG interface for debugging.

Amazon EC2 users will soon have the ability to add OpenGL acceleration to existing EC2 instance types. Amazon-optimized OpenGL library will automatically detect and make use of Elastic GPUs. Amazon will start out with Windows support for OpenGL, and plan to add support for the Amazon Linux AMI and other versions of OpenGL after that. The GPU added to the instance can have 1, 2, 4, or 8 gigabytes of video memory. It’s becoming much easier to use OpenGL from GPUs in the cloud.

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