Browser tagged news

Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web.

Basemark, the developer of industry-standard benchmarks for performance and power consumption analysis, today launches Basemark Web 3.0 browser benchmarking tool. With the new tool, Basemark extends support from mobile devices and VR to all connected devices that run a modern web browser, such as laptops and desktop PCs.

glTF Ecosystem Takeoff! The glTF Working Group 15th March 2016If you are a Web developer, you may know and love WebGL, the Khronos standard that defines a JavaScript binding to the OpenGL ES API. Up to now, 3D has been unique in not having a widely established format that browsers and apps have agreed to use to send assets efficiently across the Web: photos have JPEGs, music has MP3s, and movies have MP4 – well now 3D has glTF! Although the glTF 1.0 specification was released just a few months ago, in October 2015, it is already gaining friends and allies across the industry. Learn more about glTF in the Khronos Developer Blog.

A-Frame is an open source framework for easily creating WebVR experiences with HTML. It is designed and maintained by MozVR (Mozilla’s virtual reality team research team). A-Frame wraps WebGL in HTML custom elements, enabling web developers to create 3D VR scenes that leverage WebGL’s power, without having to learn its complex low-level API. Because WebGL is ubiquitous in modern browsers on desktop and mobile, A-Frame experiences work across desktop, iPhone (Android support coming soon), and Oculus Rift headsets.

If you're a Star Wars fan and have a computer and a smart phone, give this Chrome Experiment a try. From Engadget, "Lightsaber Escape is a Chrome Experiment that Google made in conjunction with Lucasfilm and Star Wars visual-effects studio Industrial Light & Magic. It uses WebGL for the 3D graphics, plus WebRTC and WebSocket for the real-time communication between your phone and desktop."

WebGL, Blend4Web, NASA and the Curiosity RoverNASA released a new Blend4Web-powered project powered by WebGL. To celebrate the 3rd anniversary of Curiosity Mars Rover landing on the red planet, NASA has developed a web application to reflect the most prominent moments of this space mission. This app is both very informative and intriguing: you can move the rover, control its cameras and the robotic arm and even take a selfie! The 3D content is integrated with martian landscape photos linked to locations and events via HTML interface and markers. Seamless integration of these different data types is guaranteed by WebGL as a native browser technology. We believe that the successful implementation of such an ambitious project marks a significant milestone in the development of Internet technologies in general and WebGL, in particular.

PlayCanvas announces Physically Based Rendering is now available via WebGL. Over the past 3 years since PlayCanvas started, WebGL adoption has skyrocketed. WebGL now supported in every major browser, both on mobile and the desktop. Current statistics show that 82.7% of web users have the ability to run WebGL content, and this number continues to rise. The PlayCanvas ‘Star-Lord Demo’ shows that WebGL is perfectly capable of implementing PBR and other high-end graphical features.

This Wikipedia visualization was created by French computer science student Owen Cornec. Each “star” in WikiGalaxy is a single article on Wikipedia. Highly related articles are placed close to each other in space with connections between them. While this is a Chrome experiment running WebGL and HTML5, WikiGalaxy should work in most modern browsers.