Blog tagged news

VkRunner is a tool written by Neil Roberts, inspired by shader_runner. VkRunner was the result of the Igalia work to enable ARB_gl_spirv extension for Intel’s i965 driver on Mesa, where there was a need to test driver’s code against a good number of shaders to be sure that it was fine. Neil has written a blog post with example code on how to use VkRunner.

The Khronos Safety Critical Advisory Forum (KSCAF) gathers safety critical experts from a wide range of disciplines, such as transportation and medical imaging, who have experience developing software and products to widely adopting standards. The goal of KSCAF is to develop guidelines and recommendations for engineers creating open standard APIs within Khronos, and elsewhere in the industry, so that those standards can help streamline the product safety certification process. The Forum’s chair looks back on a successful 2018, with plans to expand in the new year ahead.

Vulkan Memory Allocator (VMA) is AMDs single-header STB-like library for easily and efficiently managing memory allocation for your Vulkan games and applications. The last three months of VMA development since the release of v2.1 have mostly focused on significantly improving and fleshing out the memory defragmentation support, adding support for sparse binding, and making sure the library had a rich and robust set of allocation strategies for games and other Vulkan applications to use. For all the details, read the GPU Open blog.

Rys Sommefeldt, who looks after the Game Engineering group in Europe which is part of the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD, has written a short blog on decoding radeon Vulkan versions. Rys writes "We have a practical problem that will be familiar to anyone in the midst of developing any complex packaged software: we need to ship multiple driver components developed at different cadences and in certain ways, all packaged together and distributed, to be installed as a unit." Read on to learn about his solution.

The demand for 3D content is growing quickly across markets. New formats, applications, and tools are being developed to keep up with the demand . TurboSquid has been eagerly watching the development of the glTF 2.0 specification and has now added full support for the format for its StemCell initiative, which standardizes how 3D models are built and makes buying a 3D model as easy as buying a stock photo.

Draco is a glTF extension for mesh compression along with an open-source library developed by Google to compress and decompress 3D meshes to significantly reduce the size of 3D content. Cesium has been collaborating with Khronos and Google to make Draco a glTF extension, and you can now load Draco compressed models and 3D tilesets in Cesium. Learn more about Draco, how it works and what it has to offer.

glTF continues to gain strong industry momentum with new support from major players including Facebook, Adobe, Epic, and Unity, in addition to the ongoing support from the grassroots open-source community. Facebook’s recent adoption of glTF 2.0 enables its users to place and see 3D content in their News Feeds, underscoring the social media platform’s plan to enable users to bring 3D objects and assets with them across AR, VR, mobile, and web experiences — using open standards. Khronos has released new glTF testing tools, samples, and exporters to support this growing ecosystem.

As technology around artificial intelligence and autonomous driving advances, the need for safety critical systems also grows. Khronos Group has created a Safety Critical Advisory Forum and invites functional safety experts to join the group to advise and help develop open standards for the safety critical domain. By contributing your expertise to Khronos’ safety-critical work, you will enable Khronos and its API designers to deliver safety-critical APIs for a safer autonomous world.

New functionality in Vulkan 1.1 includes Subgroup Operations that enable highly-efficient sharing and manipulation of data between multiple tasks running in parallel on a GPU. Khronos member and guest author Neil Henning (@sheredom), Principal Software Engineer, for Vulkan & SPIR-V at Codeplay Software has written an in-depth tutorial on how to use this new feature. Head on over to the Khronos blog and check out the tutorial. Feedback is welcome.

Standards make life easier, and we depend on them for more than we might realize — from knowing exactly how to drive any car, to knowing how to get hot or cold water from a faucet. Balancing the need for a stable standard, while at the same time allowing technology advances to be rapidly exploited, is a big part of what Khronos does. There are two ways a Khronos standard can be extended: Vendor Extensions and Khronos Extensions. Read on to learn how both of these work within Khronos.

Authoring content for a new file format can be exciting, liberating, and at the same time scary. To be the most efficient and avoid frustration, it helps to understand the format's requirements. To help achieve this, Patrick Ryan from Microsoft has created a walk through following several paths for authoring content in the glTF format as well as outlining specific settings to maximize your success. Patrick touches on both free and commercial software packages to ensure everyone has a path into glTF. Let's get going... check out this glTF how-to.

Blog: Machine learning’s fragmentation problem — and the solution from Khronos, NNEFThere is a wide range of open-source deep learning training networks available today offering researchers and designers plenty of choice when they are setting up their project. Caffe, Tensorflow, Chainer, Theano, Caffe2, the list goes on and is getting longer all the time. This diversity is great for encouraging innovation, as the different approaches taken by the various frameworks make it possible to access a very wide range of capabilities, and, of course, to add functionality that’s then given back to the community. This helps to drive the virtuous cycle of innovation.

NNEF from Khronos will enable universal interoperability for machine learning developers and implementersThe Khronos Group is about to release a new standard method of moving trained neural networks among frameworks, and between frameworks and inference engines. The new standard is the Neural Network Exchange Format (NNEF™); it has been in design for over a year and will be available to the public by the end of 2017. Learn more about NNEF and the upcoming released in the Khronos blog post.