OpenCL related stories

GDC Presentation by Valve: Vulkan - The Future of High Performance Graphics

GDC Vault now has the full "Vulkan: The Future of High Performance Graphics" presentation from Valve. There are also the Khronos Group presentations on Vulkan , OpenCL 2.1, SPIR-V and the WebGL Meetup on Youtube.

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New Synopsys ASIP Designer Tool speeds development of Application-Specific Instruction-Set

Synopsys, Inc announced availability of its new ASIP Designer tool that speeds the design of application-specific instruction-set processors (ASIPs) and programmable accelerators. Integrated LLVM-based compiler front-end and OpenCL kernel language support enables efficient compilation of C, C++ and OpenCL-based application code.

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FinalWire Unveils AIDA64 v5.20 and AIDA64 with support for OpenCL 2.1

The new AIDA64 release implements optimized benchmarks for AMD “Carrizo” and Intel “Broadwell” processors, SensorPanel and external LCD improvements, and supports the latest nVIDIA GeForce and Quadro graphics accelerators, including OpenCL 2.1 support.

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Vulkan SPIR-V, OpenCL 2.1 and WebGL presentations from GTC available online

Neil Trevett, Khronos Group President, spoke at the recent GPU Technology Conference on Vulkan, SPIR-V and OpenCL 2.1 as well as at the WebGL Meetup on Building Standards. Both presentations are now available online.

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Neil Trevett on the New Vulkan API, OpenCL 2.1 and SPIR-V

Voices of VR has three new podcasts featuring Neil Trevett, President of the Khronos Group. The podcasts include an overview of the Khronos Group, the new Vulkan API, OpenCL 2.1 and SPIR-V.

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Khronos Group presentation slides from Vulkan and OpenCL sessions now online

The Khronos group has uploaded slide decks from the Vulkan and OpenCL presentations at GDC. The original press briefing slide deck is included. The slides cover SPIR-V as well and can also be seen in the online video from the March 5th Vulkan session.

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Vulkan session will be Live Streamed

Please join us at 2PM pacific time for a Live Stream of the second and last Vulkan session at GDC. There will be better quality video and slides available in the next few days.

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Redefining the shading languages ecosystem with SPIR-V

G-Truc Creation has posted an excellent and well balanced overview of SPIR-V – The first open standard intermediate language for parallel compute and graphics. "I am looking forward to the shading language revolution that SPIR-V will lead to, one step at a time!" sums up Christophe Riccio.

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Khronos Releases OpenCL 2.1 Provisional Specification for Public Review


The Khronos Group today announced the ratification and public release of the OpenCL 2.1 provisional specification. OpenCL 2.1 is a significant evolution of the open, royalty-free standard for heterogeneous parallel programming that defines a new kernel language based on a subset of C++ for significantly enhanced programmer productivity, and support for the new Khronos SPIR-V cross-API shader program intermediate language now used by both OpenCL and the new Vulkan graphics API.

Press Release: Khronos Releases OpenCL 2.1 Provisional Specification for Public Review
Video of Live OpenCL Session
OpenCL Feedback thread: We look forward to hearing from you.
Overview slide: Powerpoint presentation outlining OpenCL 2.1

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Khronos Releases SPIR-V The first open standard intermediate language for parallel compute and graphics


In another significant announcement today, OpenCL 2.1 and Vulkan™, the new open standard API for high-efficiency access to graphics and compute on modern GPUs, are now sharing core intermediate language technologies resulting in SPIR-V; a revolution in the Khronos Standard Portable Intermediate Representation initially used by OpenCL™, now fully defined by Khronos with native support for shader and kernel features. SPIR-V splits the compiler chain, enabling high-level language front-ends to emit programs in a standardized intermediate form to be ingested by Vulkan or OpenCL drivers. Eliminating the need for a built-in high-level language source compiler significantly reduces driver complexity and will enable a diversity of language front-ends. Additionally, a standardized IR provides a measure of kernel IP protection, accelerated kernel load times and enables developers to use a common language front-end, improving kernel reliability and portability across multiple implementations. You can read more on the SPIR homepage, registry and whitepaper, and give us valuable community feedback in our SPIR forum.

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