News Archives

The landscape of APIs for accelerating vision and neural network software using specialized processors continues to rapidly evolve. Many industry-standard APIs, such as OpenCL and OpenVX, are being upgraded to increasingly focus on deep learning, and the industry is rapidly adopting the new generation of low-level, explicit GPU APIs, such as Vulkan, that tightly integrate graphics and compute. Neil Trevett presented the "Vision Acceleration API Landscape: Options and Trade-offs" tutorial at the May 2017 Embedded Vision Summit.

With SIGGRAPH 2017 almost behind us, we wanted to ensure you could find everything Khronos related one place:

Why we should all support glTF 2.0 as THE standard asset exchange format for game enginesGodot Engine now supports the full glTF 2.0 specification. With the release of Godot 3.0 alpha1, users needed more content to test with the new 3D engine. Sites like Sketchfab provide plenty of PBR-ready assets for downloading, and plugins that export scenes from other popular game engines to this format. The surprise, though, is how good this format is for video game asset exchange. Nothing as good existed before, and it solves a problem that we, as an industry, have been struggling with for a long time. Khronos, with glTF 2.0, has given us a fantastic chance to standardize a smooth workflow between 3D modelling software and game engines. To better understand why, a list of previous attempts will be explained and why they failed.

Khronos member MAXON announced the next generation of its professional 3D application, Cinema 4D Release 19 (R19), which offers both tools and enhancements artists can put to use immediately, and provides a peek at the future. MAXON will debut Cinema 4D R19 during SIGGRAPH 2017 in LA, where the developer can be found at booth #701. MAXON has introduced OpenGL capabilities in BodyPaint 3D, MAXON’s professional paint and texturing toolset.

There’s now a JavaScript library for executing neural networks inside a webpage, using the hardware-accelerated graphics API available in modern web browsers. Developed by a team of MIT graduate students, TensorFire can run TensorFlow-style machine learning models on any GPU. TensorFire works using the WebGL standard, a cross-platform system for rendering GPU-accelerated graphics in browsers. WebGL supports GLSL, a C-like language used to write shaders, which are short programs used to transform data directly on the GPU.

Only a few days after the 1.35.x release, GPU Caps Viewer 1.36.x has been released with support for OpenGL 4.6. OpenGL 4.6 introduces the support of SPIR-V modules in OpenGL and the set of SPIR-V extensions is listed exposed in the OpenGL panel. There are a few Vulkan improvements as well in this version. GPU Caps Viewer is a graphics card information utility focused on the OpenGL, Vulkan, OpenCL and CUDA API level support of the main (primary) graphics card.

To coincide with the release of OpenGL 4.6, NVIDIA is pleased to announce the immediate availability of our OpenGL 4.6 beta drivers for Windows and Linux. These drivers provide full OpenGL 4.6 and GLSL 4.60 functionality and also add support for the GL_KHR_parallel_shader_compile extension released today. This beta release is based on the published OpenGL 4.6 Khronos Specification, and is expected to pass the OpenGL 4.6 Khronos Conformance Testing Process when available. Current conformance status can be found online. Further details and driver downloads are available at the NVIDIA OpenGL driver website.

The Khronos Group announces from the SIGGRAPH 2017 Conference the immediate public availability of the OpenGL 4.6 specification. OpenGL 4.6 integrates the functionality of numerous ARB and EXT extensions created by Khronos members AMD, Intel, and NVIDIA into core, including the capability to ingest SPIR-V shaders. Learn more about this release. Khronos encourages and welcomes all feedback on the new specification.