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The Khronos Group publicly releases the OpenVG 1.1 Lite Provisional Specification for advanced 2D vector and raster graphics, with conformance tests placed into open source under the Apache 2.0 license. OpenVG 1.1 Lite enables this high-quality 2D vector graphics API to be fully accelerated by any OpenGL ES 2.0-compatible GPU for the first time, significantly increasing the range of devices on which it can be deployed. The Provisional Specification is released in markdown format on GitHub to enable the developer community to provide input and feedback before the specification and conformance tests are finalized.

Khronos Group Welcomes Holochip Corporation as Associate Member

Holochip was founded on the philosophy that the emergence of affordable, durable, and high-quality variable-focus lenses signifies a new and sustainable photonics market segment - the adaptive lens - born at the crossroads of traditional lenses and adaptive optics. Widespread adoption of high quality adaptive lenses will enable a new generation of lighter, more capable and lower cost, display, imaging and laser systems. We will enable engineers, scientists, product developers and consumers with innovative solutions for utilizing and manipulating light.

In the latest Steam Beta from May 25, a new option in the Shader Pre-Caching settings, allows you to enable “Allow background processing of Vulkan shaders”. This is a step towards making Steam games on Linux run smoother. For those interested in a little background, it’s using the Fossilize library and Vulkan layer which you can find on Valve’s GitHub.

On June 2nd, Christine Perey of PEREY Research & Consulting will host a public webinar: Paul Davies of the Boeing Company will share how following the progress of OpenXR and other standards is helping companies future-proof their deployments and investments in AR technologies; Neil Trevett, President of the Khronos Group, and Brent Insko, Lead VR Architect at Intel and OpenXR Working Group Chair, will present the OpenXR architecture, and provide an overview of a typical OpenXR application lifecycle including the order of function calls, creation of objects, session state changes, and the rendering loop.

C++ Ray-Tracing in a Weekend by Peter Shirley is a great resource to start learning about ray-tracers and how to implement one, and at the same time providing all the source code in a GitHub repository. The main goal of this blog post is not to teach the concepts of ray-tracing, Peter does a great job of that, but provide a walk-through tutorial on how to accelerate practical applications and algorithms using SYCL. Read on to learn more.

At Laval Virtual, Ryan Pavlik presented “Unifying Reality: Building Experiences with OpenXR”, a master class on OpenXR, the open standard API for building VR and AR experiences that work across devices, now and into the future. With version OpenXR 1.0 officially released at SIGGRAPH 2019, the standard has grown through increased adoption, vendor and multi-vendor extensions for additional functionality, and the upcoming release of the conformance test suite for verifying runtimes. As the OpenXR specification editor, Ryan provided an in-depth look at how the OpenXR application is structured, how the “action”-based interaction system works, and more. Below is the full recording and slides of his presentation. You can also see what his talk was like in VR here.

Connect directly with NVIDIA Developer Technology Engineers on OpenGL and Vulkan-related topics to get answers to all of your questions. Whether you have questions about regular graphics use, compute shaders, ray tracing, or interop between the apis, we’re here to help you with questions around the Khronos graphics apis. Space is limited to 150 people, so don’t wait to sign-up.

​Collabora announces the 0.14 release of xrdesktop, the Open Source project which enables interaction with traditional desktop environments, such as GNOME and KDE, in VR. The most exciting improvement is that xrdesktop is now able to run on XR runtimes providing the OpenXR API, which enables running xrdesktop on a full Open Source stack with Monado.

​Godot Engine has started up their Vulkan Progress Reports after 3 month hiatus. GamingOnLinux touts Godot Engine as making more impressive progress towards Vulkan API support. Godot 4.0 will see many improvements including: using a special screen-space filter to correctly simulate roughness; GLSL shaders (not Godot shaders, real GLSL 4.50+Vulkan extensions) can now be imported and will be automatically imported and converted to SPIR-V when found; allowing you to have low level access to the rendering APIs. Check out the report to learn more.

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