News Archives

Desktop OpenGL ES 3.1 on Mali GPUs with Panfrost

Panfrost, the open source driver for Arm Mali Midgard & Bifrost GPUs now provides desktop, non-conformant OpenGL ES 3.1. Panfrost’s desktop OpenGL support is native, reducing CPU overhead. Applications can now make use of the hardware’s hidden features, like explicit primitive restart indices, alpha testing, and quadrilaterals.

New Vulkan SDK Release Streamlines Vulkan Development for Apple

Today, the functionality of the Vulkan SDK gets a major upgrade for Vulkan developers targeting Apple platforms. LunarG is now shipping Device Simulation (DevSim) and Validation layers for the Vulkan SDK on macOS in addition to Linux and Windows. DevSim layers enable Vulkan application development on a highly-capable development system by “simulating” a less-capable target Vulkan implementation through constraining the reported features and resources on the more-capable platform. Validation layers verify that applications are correctly using the reported Vulkan functionality. The validation layers and associated Vulkan loader on macOS also now support Apple Silicon via Universal Binaries.

WebGL Happenings

WebGL recently held an engaging and informative virtual WebGL Meetup. Co-organizer of the event, Damon Hernandez, led the discussion and kicked off the meeting by having the Chair of WebGL, Ken Russell, give an update on the latest WebGL progress along with some “Cool WebGL Stuff.” After the update, guest speakers from Google, Sketchfab, BlackSmithSoft, xeolabs.com, Playcanvas, Unfolded and Microsoft gave individual updates on WebGL implementations.

At the end of the Meetup, the audience submitted questions for the speakers during a live Q&A. As this dialogue benefits the whole community, we’re sharing the answers in this blog.

IWOCL & SYCLcon is the premier workshop of leading academic and industrial experts to present, discuss and learn about applying OpenCL and SYCL addressing issues faced in High Performance Computing across a wide range of application domains. This is an excellent opportunity to contribute and participate in this workshop through a paper, talk, special session / tutorial, or poster. This workshop will include invited presentations from academia and industry, and a panel discussion of leading experts in the field.

Deadline for submissions is January 15th, so don’t delay. Submit your proposed content today.

Godot Introduces glTF 2.0 Scene Exporter

For Godot 4.0, a bidirectional workflow with glTF was implemented to allow for a combination of in-engine and out-of-engine tooling to work seamlessly. Importing glTF scenes has been supported since Godot 3.0, and with this release you can now export your Godot scenes to glTF and then imported into other apps to make edits continuously. This workflow means you can work on your scene in Blender and then bring it back into Godot for more work.

Ray tracing has become Diligent

Khronos has recently released the final versions of the ray tracing extension specifications. It is latest release, Diligent Engine enabled full support of these extensions to provide easy-to-use yet fully exhaustive cross-platform ray tracing API. The API is the same for Vulkan and Direct3D12 and allows authoring shaders in HLSL for both back-ends. GLSL and SPIRV bytecode are also supported by Vulkan back-end. The API lets developers concentrate on the algorithm essence and leave handling of the implementation-specific details to the engine.
A new tutorial demonstrates how ray tracing API in Diligent Engine can be used to simulate physics-based light transport in a scene to render soft shadows, multiple-bounce reflections and refractions, and dispersion.

The Latest Khronos Updates from SIGGRAPH Asia 2020

The Khronos Group sessions from SIGGRAPH Asia are now available. Watch to hear:

  • Khronos President, Neil Trevett, give an Open Standards Update
  • glTF’s Ed Mackey shows off next-generation PBR materials for glTF
  • Nathaniel Hunter from DreamView discusses 3D Commerce’s Asset Creation Guidelines
  • OpenXR Chair, Brent Insko, gives us an informative OpenXR update
  • HTC’s, Tony Lin, demonstrates the Vive Cosmos OpenXR developer preview
  • WebGL Chair, Ken Russell gives an in-depth update on WebGL
  • Vulkan Chair, Tom Olson, updates us on Vulkan’s latest deliverables and future directions
  • Followed by Neil Trevett who gives us the latest from the ANARI Working Group’s work on an analytical rendering API for the scientific community

Come and hear the latest from The Khronos Group!

Microsoft Flight Simulator VR Update Using OpenXR Available Now

The flight sim community has been a very active and insightful partner in shaping how the Microsoft approached VR, and continues to be a critical partner in Microsoft’s continued development in making further improvements and adding new features to the simulation. Adding VR to Microsoft Flight Simulator was a direct result of community feedback.

Microsoft’s goal was to make this update accessible to as many VR players as possible. To achieve this goal, they worked to make this free update compatible across a wide range of supported devices, including most Windows Mixed Reality headsets (including the HP Reverb G2), Oculus, Valve, and HTC headsets using OpenXR. To access VR, make sure you have downloaded the latest update for Microsoft Flight Simulator.

Remograph, providers of products and services for the computer graphics, visual simulation and 3D modeling markets, announced the release of Remo 3D v2.10. Remo 3D is an effective OpenGL-based tool for creating and modifying 3D models intended for realtime visualization. The primary file format is OpenFlight. Remo 3D is currently available for Microsoft Windows 10/8/7 and Linux. This new version 2.10 of Remo 3D brings support for more keyboard shortcuts, improved macro handling, setting of relative external reference paths and other various fixes. The full list of new features and improvements can be found in the release notes on our website.

OpenCL Rolls Out Maintenance Release and C++ for OpenCL Documentation

OpenCL Rolls Out Maintenance Release and C++ for OpenCL Documentation

Today Khronos released v3.0.6 of the OpenCL Specifications. This is a regular maintenance release with bug fixes and clarifications, an updated address spaces section, new extensions for additional subgroup functions, and an extension for enhanced platform and device version queries. Also, documentation for the C++ for OpenCL V1.0 kernel language is now downloadable from an OpenCL-Docs GitHub repository tag, describing how the language combines C++17 functionality with familiar OpenCL kernel language paradigms. An extension for online compilation of C++ for OpenCL kernels was published earlier this year and offline compilation of C++ for OpenCL kernels has been supported by clang release 9.0 onwards.

PoCL is a portable open source (MIT-licensed) implementation of the OpenCL standard (1.2 with some 2.0 features supported). In addition to being an easily portable multi-device (truely heterogeneous) open-source OpenCL implementation, a major goal of this project is improving interoperability of diversity of OpenCL-capable devices by integrating them to a single centrally orchestrated platform. Also one of the key goals longer term is to enhance performance portability of OpenCL programs across device types utilizing runtime and compiler techniques.

Version 1.6 release Highlights: Support for Clang/LLVM 11.0, improved CUDA performance and features, improved PowerPC support and enhanced OpenCL debugging usage.

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