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Announcements, articles, and blurbs from Khronos and Khronos members about Khronos tech, conformant products, and more. If you are a interested in submitting a blog post, please check out our Blog Guidelines.


Introduction With the release of the VK_EXT_mesh_shader extension Vulkan gets an alternative geometry rasterization pipeline. This extension brings cross-vendor mesh shading to Vulkan, with a focus on improving functional compatibility with DirectX 12. Mesh and Task shaders follow the compute programming model and use threads cooperatively to generate meshes within a workgroup. The vertex and index data for these meshes are written similarly to s

Khronos opens Machine Learning Forum for anyone to join. Initiative seeks to enable system developers to deploy ML algorithms and applications efficiently across multiple platforms. The speed of innovation within the machine learning ecosystem is faster than ever before, and shows no signs of slowing with new architectures regularly hitting the headlines. While such innovations are fantastic in driving performance and functionality, the sheer diversity of hardware and software solutions poses a challenge for developers hoping to support the latest advancements, while also reaching the widest audience.

With the release of OpenCL™ 3.0 the OpenCL Working Group has made significant investments to improve the OpenCL developer experience. As part of those efforts, multiple parts of the OpenCL ecosystem received considerable updates and it is worthwhile to recap what's changed and what can be expected to improve in the future.

Khronos has introduced a new extension named VK_EXT_graphics_pipeline_library that allows for shaders to be compiled much earlier than at full Pipeline State Object (PSO) creation time. By leveraging this extension, I was able to avoid many causes of frame hitches due to PSOs being late-created at draw time in the Source 2 Vulkan renderer. Read on to learn more about VK_EXT_graphics_pipeline_library.

Demand for advanced GPU-accelerated graphics and compute is growing in a wide range of industries where safety is paramount, such as automotive and avionics. When a compute or display system failure would pose a significant safety risk it is vital that systems meet safety-critical standards such as ISO 26262.

Vulkan SC is a low-level, deterministic API that enables safety-critical system implementers to deploy state-of-the-art GPU graphics and compute acceleration by streamlining the system-level safety certification process. Vulkan SC can also be invaluable for real-time embedded applications, even if not formally safety certified.

Vulkan SC 1.0 is evolved from Vulkan 1.2 and includes the removal of runtime functionality that is not needed in safety-critical markets, an updated design to provide predictable execution times and results, and clarifications to remove potential ambiguity in its operation. The definitive list of changes and added functionality is documented in the Vulkan SC 1.0 Specification Appendix H: Vulkan SC Deviations from Base Vulkan.

This article provides a summary of the updates that have been made to create Vulkan SC 1.0, and explains how these new capabilities are typically used in applications. It is assumed that the reader has a reasonable understanding of the Vulkan API.

Esri is a member of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®), and has been delivering geospatial solutions for over 5 decades, investing significant brain power to solve one vexing problem in the geospatial world: making massive geospatial content available across platforms and devices, including web browsers, mobile devices, and desktop applications. In response to that challenge, the Indexed 3D Scene Layer (I3S) specification was created about a decade ago. Esri worked with the community to release the specification under an Apache license in 2015. The OGC adopted I3S in 2017 as its first 3D streaming Community Standard.

One of the great headaches of developing interactive graphics applications for online deployment is covering every base. Your targets likely include a near-infinite combination of browser vendors, browser versions, and graphics hardware. The Khronos Group created WebGL to slice through this Gordian knot, rendering high-performance interactive graphics in any compatible browser, and on any graphics processing unit, without the need for plug-ins. Now, with support for WebGL 2.0 in Safari 15 for both macOS and iOS, we’re happy to report that “compatible browsers” includes pretty much all of them.

The Vulkan API is under constant development, with an ever-growing pool of extensions to solve problems and add valuable new features. However, extensions typically don't come with a deployment timeline or a guarantee of which devices will support them. As a result, it can be hard for developers to have a clear picture of when and where extensions will be supported, and what functionality can be relied on for current and future projects. This situation is even more complex for developers shipping applications across both mobile and desktop platforms. With Vulkan 1.3 and the new public roadmap, we’re taking a significant step to reduce feature fragmentation.

Community Populated Hardware Databases GPUinfo.org enables the community to build extensive databases of Khronos® API driver capabilities by uploading reports from diverse end-user devices and platforms. With more than 20,000 device reports available for Vulkan®, OpenGL®, and OpenGL ES across Windows, Linux, Android, Mac OSX, and iOS, GPUInfo.org has become a widely used resource for developers to gain detailed insights into deployed

Rendering variability across multiple platforms has long been a pain point for content creators wishing to reliably represent 3D models, such as products on a 3D Commerce website. In June 2021 Khronos launched the 3D Viewer Certification Program to bring together artists, developers, and vendors to build industry consensus on best practices for testing the consistency of rendering glTF assets in 3D viewers. These viewers are used to drive a wide variety of 3D end user experiences including interactions on social, search, and advertising platforms.

The OpenCL™ working group today released the OpenCL 3.0.10 specification including the latest round of maintenance updates, clarifications and bug fixes - in many cases responding to issues and questions from the OpenCL developer community. This latest specification includes updates for readability and accessibility, such as improved syntax highlighting, as well as new and updated extensions which are outlined below.

When we were designing Vulkan 1.0, we had an idea to embed a task-graph-like object into Vulkan in the form of the render pass object. We knew the first version would be kind of restricted because we had an API to ship, and not long to do the work - but we had plans to extend the initial version, and those extensions would eventually provide significant flexibility to the API. Eventually, render passes would support all kinds of bells and whistle